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The True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys (Limited Edition)

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Years ago, the Killjoys fought against the tyrannical megacorporation Better Living Industries, costing them their lives, save for one — the mysterious Girl. Today, the followers of the original Killjoys languish in the Desert while BLI systematically strips citizens of their individuality. As the fight for freedom fades, it's left to the Girl to take up the mantle and Years ago, the Killjoys fought against the tyrannical megacorporation Better Living Industries, costing them their lives, save for one — the mysterious Girl. Today, the followers of the original Killjoys languish in the Desert while BLI systematically strips citizens of their individuality. As the fight for freedom fades, it's left to the Girl to take up the mantle and bring down the fearsome BLI or else join the mindless ranks of Battery City! Join Gerard Way and Shaun Simon as they sing the stories of the fabulous Killjoys, the final chapter of the Danger Days saga by My Chemical Romance. This oversized, limited edition hardcover includes the Free Comic Book Day story "Dead Satellites," an expanded sketchbook section, commentary by writers Gerard Way and Shaun Simon, and never-before-seen artwork by Becky Cloonan.


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Years ago, the Killjoys fought against the tyrannical megacorporation Better Living Industries, costing them their lives, save for one — the mysterious Girl. Today, the followers of the original Killjoys languish in the Desert while BLI systematically strips citizens of their individuality. As the fight for freedom fades, it's left to the Girl to take up the mantle and Years ago, the Killjoys fought against the tyrannical megacorporation Better Living Industries, costing them their lives, save for one — the mysterious Girl. Today, the followers of the original Killjoys languish in the Desert while BLI systematically strips citizens of their individuality. As the fight for freedom fades, it's left to the Girl to take up the mantle and bring down the fearsome BLI or else join the mindless ranks of Battery City! Join Gerard Way and Shaun Simon as they sing the stories of the fabulous Killjoys, the final chapter of the Danger Days saga by My Chemical Romance. This oversized, limited edition hardcover includes the Free Comic Book Day story "Dead Satellites," an expanded sketchbook section, commentary by writers Gerard Way and Shaun Simon, and never-before-seen artwork by Becky Cloonan.

30 review for The True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys (Limited Edition)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    We all know the future is going to suck in a big way, but could someone at least write a fairly entertaining graphic novel about it. Well, some people can: See The Massive as an example. Gerard Way, sorry, but no, I’ll pass on your dystopian vision. Why? Let’s see: Random and unfocused world building - check Incoherent story – check Sub plots that flow together like sewage and wine - check Poorly conceived characters you don’t care about – check Characters whose motivations are a complete mystery – We all know the future is going to suck in a big way, but could someone at least write a fairly entertaining graphic novel about it. Well, some people can: See The Massive as an example. Gerard Way, sorry, but no, I’ll pass on your dystopian vision. Why? Let’s see: Random and unfocused world building - check Incoherent story – check Sub plots that flow together like sewage and wine - check Poorly conceived characters you don’t care about – check Characters whose motivations are a complete mystery – check Characters who are connected to one another, but just how, well, that’s a mystery, because the writer is too lazy to connect the dots - check Character who go from point A to point B, but its’ never explained or more importantly, shown, how – check What’s to like Porno droids The cute kitty* What’s not to like Pretty much everything *I changed my mind not the cute kitty, just the Porno droids.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Liviania

    I really enjoy concept albums. I first became aware of the My Chemical Romance album Danger Days: True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys when I caught the music video for "Na Na Na" on late night television. I was caught up in the world, so it was pretty exciting when I saw that MCR front-man Gerard Way had teamed up with comics writer Shaun Simon to explore what happened after the album and the videos. I think only the "Na Na Na" and "Sing" videos are absolutely necessary, but I'd still recommend I really enjoy concept albums. I first became aware of the My Chemical Romance album Danger Days: True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys when I caught the music video for "Na Na Na" on late night television. I was caught up in the world, so it was pretty exciting when I saw that MCR front-man Gerard Way had teamed up with comics writer Shaun Simon to explore what happened after the album and the videos. I think only the "Na Na Na" and "Sing" videos are absolutely necessary, but I'd still recommend watching those and listening to the album before picking up THE TRUE LIVES OF THE FABULOUS KILLJOYS. The Girl, the sole surviving member of the Killjoys, joins up with a new group at the beginning of the comic. But this group's leader might be a little off his hinges. Meanwhile, back in Battery City, Korse is starting to no longer perfectly follow orders for Better Living Industries and a droid is desperately trying to save her older-model-droid girlfriend. There are a lot of characters to follow in six issues, but things come together by the end. The focus really is one the Girl and her coming into her own. One of the questions raised by the music videos is why the Killjoys were protecting her. It's something she's wondered herself. But she can find and forge her own path even as she discovers the answer to that question. It's paralleled by company-man Korse questioning the path that he's followed for so long. I liked seeing this world fleshed out farther and getting some answers to lingering questions. I thought Becky Cloonan's art did a wonderful job of capturing the look of the videos and translating it to a 2D medium. At the same time, if you aren't already a fan of the world, there is a lot to pick up. There is very little time spent rehashing information from the album. I'd say this is a yes for fans of Danger Days, but a pass for everyone else.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ann D-Vine

    I decided to have a Gerard Way kinda day - so I sat back and listened to Danger Days: The True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys. It's a pretty fantastic album, if you like that sort of music - modern punk rock, more subversive than the likes of, say, The Sex Pistols, but no less intrinsically angry, and with the sort of narrative creativity that reminds one of the likes of envelope-pushing proto-punk like Velvet Underground. Wait. What website am I on? Oh, right, Goodreads. It's a good album, I decided to have a Gerard Way kinda day - so I sat back and listened to Danger Days: The True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys. It's a pretty fantastic album, if you like that sort of music - modern punk rock, more subversive than the likes of, say, The Sex Pistols, but no less intrinsically angry, and with the sort of narrative creativity that reminds one of the likes of envelope-pushing proto-punk like Velvet Underground. Wait. What website am I on? Oh, right, Goodreads. It's a good album, though! Go listen, I guess. You can't read it, though. It is music. I mention it, though, because this comic, that album, and the album's accompanying music videos, are sort of linked, like a sort of multimedia project, in a way. Less tangled a web than, say, Shadows of the Empire, it is nonetheless true that your enjoyment of this comic, the album, and the videos, are symbiotic. Reading one without listening to the other might reap some rewards, but I found that, reading the comic heightened my enjoyment of the My Chemical Romance tracks, and vice versa. The music videos in particular - short films set to tracks from the Danger Days album, basically - provide the necessary introduction for characters, locations, and events that are handed off in the comic as things you're expected to already know. So there you go. With everything wrapped up tightly, though, I'm happy to report that I like The True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys a lot. Gerard Way and his co-author Shaun Simon have created a world unlike any I've really seen before. It evokes memories of a lot of prior works - Blade Runner, Mad Max, Tank Girl, a lot of anime and manga (Gerard Way is notably a fan of which), and musical inspirations that find their way wormed into the comic - but it's all put together in a way that feels very organic and original. The world of Battery City and its outskirts is familiar, but very much a product of Way and Simon's own vision, and it's a brilliant creation. The plot revolves around a futuristic dystopia called Battery City. Its citizens being watched constantly by masked enforcers called Draculoids and Scarecrows, it is a bleak world, with plain labels on everything (reminiscent of Repo Man), reminders to smile by images of beaming cartoons that provide a stark juxtaposition to the grey, lifeless landscape, and PA announcements reminding everyone to have "a better day," courtesy of the omnipresent, oppressive and tyrannical Better Living Industries (BLI, or, as it is stylized constantly, BL/ind). On the outskirts of Battery City, though, live rebel teenagers, scavenging through the desert and living lives of excitement, emotion and energy, against the wishes of BLI; in the memory of a group called the Killjoys - a group of rebels who were consistently taking the fight to BLI, a sort of vigilante group that were killed trying to protect a child only known as The Girl, who BLI believed to possess some kind of powers that could tear Battery City apart. It might all seem trite or familiar, but it's eclectically creative, mind, in ways I often had trouble really parsing on the first glance. I loved turning the page and seeing absolutely daft pieces of story elements introduce themselves. There are basically three concurrent stories being told that don't cross paths until the final pages of the book, and each one comes with its own surprises. Whether it be pieces of technology in the future city, or the culture of the rebels living out of BLI's grasp, the design of Draculoids and Scarecrows, or just the way the characters dress themselves... it's a striking vision, all beautifully rendered by artist Becky Cloonan. Everything in The True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys plugs into a bombastic, stylistic world that melds a sort of childlike stupidity with a subtle, subversive genius. You know you've struck gold when you have a comic book that has lesbian sex robots in it as secondary protagonists. I don't know why that's a sign of quality, but I also don't know why I haven't seen it before. The characters are all fantastic. The Girl herself - grown up since the Killjoys died to save her - is basically a generic anime protagonist, wandering lonely a world she only barely understands, asking questions and trying to live up to a prophecy that says that she is some kind of special weapon (despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary). She has a pet cat that wanders around with her, and she's intrinsically relatable, especially since she's so often curious or baffled by things that we, as readers, are too. She runs into a group of wannabe Killjoys - a group of teens living, seemingly, to supersede the legendary vigilantes, but in ways that make them far more dangerous. The group's leader takes immense pleasure in murder, of his enemies or otherwise, and his followers are vain and superficial in ways that betray their deep passion to follow his lead. The Girl basically has to choose between striking out on her own path, or following these strange, dangerous people - perhaps the only way she'll ever take revenge on the hated BLI who killed her friends, the Killjoys. In Battery City, though, there are more stories to be told. From the aforementioned lesbian sex androids to an aging Scarecrow who is starting to turn against the orders of his superiors, it seems the gears are turning against BLI from the inside as much as in the apocalyptic desert beyond its borders. Some of it is suitably poignant (and I won't spoil, because it's actually genuinely touching and beautiful, and I'd hate for it not to have the impact on you it had on me), but let's just say that BLI is a bit apposed to things that a lot of people have trouble being accepted for even in today's seemingly not-a-dystopian-future-city society. Then there are seriously chilling lines, like a mother telling her child (who wished upon a "star") that "you know there are no more stars". It's more horrific for its silliness, though, as, in one very out-of-left-field scene, it is revealed that the main villainess is a whip-wielding dominatrix in her spare time. I don't know what that's meant to signify (if anything), but it's certainly a curio the likes of which this comic frequently indulges in presenting. As a standalone project, I think do really like this book. As a multimedia package, though, with the My Chemical Romance album at hand, it's really an experience quite unlike anything else. There are a few things I could nitpick, but overall my feelings are startlingly positive, especially as my mind revisits it - it's the sort of story that works really well if you let it gestate, let it grow on you. It has undoubtedly grown on me, from the unique voices that Way and Simon possess, to the deft illustrations by an artist who walks the line between Western and Eastern styles with notable aplomb. It's a mess in places, but then, it is punk, and isn't that how it goes? To quote the desert's own mad DJ, Dr. Death-Defying: "It's time to do it now, and do it loud."

  4. 5 out of 5

    Anthony Vacca

    Sure, who doesn't want to flee to the desert, wear Beetlejuice leggings and leather jackets, dye their hair bright colors and wear make-up, join a snotty punk-rock gang of outlaws and plan daring overthrows of corporate America (that heartless machine we all agree we hate)? But that doesn't excuse a barely patched together comic based off of the flimsy plotting of a fucking rock opera. Not even the lithe, cyber-punk meets Road Warrior artwork can save this throwaway teenage daydream. Meh. Read Sure, who doesn't want to flee to the desert, wear Beetlejuice leggings and leather jackets, dye their hair bright colors and wear make-up, join a snotty punk-rock gang of outlaws and plan daring overthrows of corporate America (that heartless machine we all agree we hate)? But that doesn't excuse a barely patched together comic based off of the flimsy plotting of a fucking rock opera. Not even the lithe, cyber-punk meets Road Warrior artwork can save this throwaway teenage daydream. Meh. Read the two volumes of The Umbrella Academy for better artwork and better writing - back when punk-superstar Gerard Way wasn't too busy playing Spaceman to write his own comic book.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

    I love this. I love this so much. The True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys is a continuation of the story told in the music videos 'Na Na Na' and 'Sing' by My Chemical Romance (my favourite band and I am still in denial about their split) from their album Danger Days: The True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys. It's basically the aftermath of the showdown between Better Living industries and the Killjoys, a sneak-peak into Battery City and it's way of life and basically what everything means. If you I love this. I love this so much. The True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys is a continuation of the story told in the music videos 'Na Na Na' and 'Sing' by My Chemical Romance (my favourite band and I am still in denial about their split) from their album Danger Days: The True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys. It's basically the aftermath of the showdown between Better Living industries and the Killjoys, a sneak-peak into Battery City and it's way of life and basically what everything means. If you love MCR then you'll love this awesome comic.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kate M. Colby

    The True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys must be reviewed in two ways. First, as with any book, it must be reviewed as a stand-alone work. However, given the larger Killjoys world that Way has crafted, The True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys must also be reviewed as the third corner of the Killjoys media triangle. In isolation, The True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys is a relatively solid book. Visually and lyrically, the book is highly-stylized. The art is colorful and explosive. The text is The True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys must be reviewed in two ways. First, as with any book, it must be reviewed as a stand-alone work. However, given the larger Killjoys world that Way has crafted, The True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys must also be reviewed as the third corner of the Killjoys media triangle. In isolation, The True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys is a relatively solid book. Visually and lyrically, the book is highly-stylized. The art is colorful and explosive. The text is punchy and poetic. Way has definitely crafted a unique style to serve as a physical reflection of the Killjoys world. That being said, the story is mostly solid, but it is a bit lacking in some places. The story builds nicely, follows an interesting variety of characters whose individual stories overlap fluidly, and leads to a satisfying conclusion. However, at times, the side characters can feel a bit generic and flat. While someone could read and understand this text without the background knowledge provided by My Chemical Romance's "Danger Days: The True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys" album and music videos, when considered in full isolation, the story lacks much of the emotional energy that the music creates, and the story and the style could be a bit confusing for new entrees into the Killjoys world. When considered as the third piece to the Killjoys media triangle (with the Danger Days album and its music videos being the first two -- and the Mad Gear and Missile Kid EP as part of the album), Killjoys is a much more satisfying book. Fans of the album and music videos will appreciate a lyrical crossover, the major roles and cameos by characters mentioned in the music and videos, and a more in-depth look at the Killjoys world. Many questions -- beyond the obvious: why is the girl special? -- are answered by the comic, and many new details are introduced that mutually enrich the album, EP, and the videos. For those already living in the Killjoys world, the comic is the missing piece, and it is flamboyant, satisfying, and downright powerful. Overall, Gerard Way's The True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys is an entertaining and powerful read. While it has more meaning when the reader is aware of the music album, EP, and videos, it is still enjoyable and captivating as one's only introduction into the Killjoys world. Way takes on a huge task by crafting a unique post-apocalyptic world in three media, and while there are still details that could have been fleshed out and explained in more depth, he manages to create a world that is energetic, meaningful, and entirely possible (in a social-thematic sense). As a Killjoy, I give it five stars. However, as a general reader, considering only the text, I had to give it four.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Read it because I follow Becky Cloonan's works, and she didn't disappoint. She has her nice style and this is some of her most professional, clean work she's done. I hated the story though. It didn't do anything for me. There were some interesting concepts presented but they were presented in such a disorientating way. I didn't care about any of the characters, and eventually just started looking at the artwork and not caring about the story. It took me months to finish this book, I finally read Read it because I follow Becky Cloonan's works, and she didn't disappoint. She has her nice style and this is some of her most professional, clean work she's done. I hated the story though. It didn't do anything for me. There were some interesting concepts presented but they were presented in such a disorientating way. I didn't care about any of the characters, and eventually just started looking at the artwork and not caring about the story. It took me months to finish this book, I finally read the second half today just to clear-up my to-read pile. I was wary going into this book because I wasn't a fan of the author's most popular work Umbrella Academy which I read years ago. I wonder why Cloonan decided to do this; I would have much rather have read one of her own stories. It irritates me to see talent wasted on illustrating a mediocre story.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Marie

    Amazing! There is so much more to this story than just the little guys destroying the big bad corporation. A must-read.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Nada Elfeituri

    I wanted to like this. I really did. It had all the elements that make up a story I'd love; written by Gerard Way, continuity from MCR, great artwork (though I would have preferred Gabriel Ba and Fabio Moon). And it did start off with the bang and rush of adrenaline that characterizes MCR. But then it just sort of...petered down to a supremely disappointing anti-climax. I had to admit by the third or fourth issue that it didn't meet expectations. The characters were weak, the story line was weak, I wanted to like this. I really did. It had all the elements that make up a story I'd love; written by Gerard Way, continuity from MCR, great artwork (though I would have preferred Gabriel Ba and Fabio Moon). And it did start off with the bang and rush of adrenaline that characterizes MCR. But then it just sort of...petered down to a supremely disappointing anti-climax. I had to admit by the third or fourth issue that it didn't meet expectations. The characters were weak, the story line was weak, the world was a flimsy construct. I wanted more backstory on BLI, on the pseudo-Killjoys in the desert, on the Analog Wars. Instead we get a very fleeting glimsp into the desert, an annoying side-story about a droid, and a few quotable lines. Ultimately, they wanted to end the story started by the album, which is more than we could have hoped for, I guess. But all the gimmicks and shoddiness were a surprise, I genuinely expected something better.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Anna Eklund

    4.5 stars So very, very much fun. Continues the story of The Girl and the Killjoys from the My Chemical Romance album Danger Days and the videos for "Na Na Na (Na Na Na Na Na Na Na Na Na)" and "SING" from that album. There were flaws, but it's just so much fun to be back in this world and to see familiar characters, words, and themes, that I'm rounding up. Plus, we find out why exactly the Killjoys were so protective of The Girl, and we see her grow up to be a character - and hero - in her own 4.5 stars So very, very much fun. Continues the story of The Girl and the Killjoys from the My Chemical Romance album Danger Days and the videos for "Na Na Na (Na Na Na Na Na Na Na Na Na)" and "SING" from that album. There were flaws, but it's just so much fun to be back in this world and to see familiar characters, words, and themes, that I'm rounding up. Plus, we find out why exactly the Killjoys were so protective of The Girl, and we see her grow up to be a character - and hero - in her own right. Becky Cloonan's art is - as always - amazing.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Yodamom

    Fabulous illustrations and a medicore story. The story was rambling and I just couldn't put it all together. It seemed very juvenile for this type of comic. Perhaps if I had read the previous series ? I did enjoy the colorful artwork enough to finish out the book but don't plan on continuing.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jacoline Maes

    Really liked this, the drawings are beautiful and the story is fun. Next to that it's cool to see the lyrics of the My Chemical Romance songs back in here.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Holly (The Grimdragon)

    This was essentially a sequel to MCR's final album, Danger Days: The True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys. It was diverse & weird & unique & visually STUNNING! The juxtaposition of the dark subject matter & the insanely colorful art was radical! I really enjoyed the hell out of this one!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Derek

    The artwork's amazing, but the story is a bit all over the place.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cassandra Fay

    I gave it two chapters, and if things didn't start making sense by then, I'd put it down. 2 stars for the two chapters! The art was cool, but that's about it. There were a tOn of characters and side-stories happening at once, and nothing was tied together. Some digital age prostitute, talk of a war, vampire things, and a group of presumed-dead terrorists. Being a fan of My Chemical Romance in my youth, I decided to pick up one of Gerard's comics, what better than one that told the story of my I gave it two chapters, and if things didn't start making sense by then, I'd put it down. 2 stars for the two chapters! The art was cool, but that's about it. There were a tOn of characters and side-stories happening at once, and nothing was tied together. Some digital age prostitute, talk of a war, vampire things, and a group of presumed-dead terrorists. Being a fan of My Chemical Romance in my youth, I decided to pick up one of Gerard's comics, what better than one that told the story of my favorite album? The writing was kinda immature, I dunno. Maybe I'll give it another shot in the future, but for now I'm thinkin nope.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Eleanor

    I am both a fan of My Chemical Romance as well as Gerard Way’s other comic book series The Umbrella Academy. I have enjoyed reading this book, mostly for how it fleshed out the world first presented in MCR’s album of the same name and how it built on the ideas first laid out in the music. I watched as this was first presented as an idea for a comic book, became an album, grew into a world through music videos as well as fan interaction on the internet and finally made it’s way back onto the I am both a fan of My Chemical Romance as well as Gerard Way’s other comic book series The Umbrella Academy. I have enjoyed reading this book, mostly for how it fleshed out the world first presented in MCR’s album of the same name and how it built on the ideas first laid out in the music. I watched as this was first presented as an idea for a comic book, became an album, grew into a world through music videos as well as fan interaction on the internet and finally made it’s way back onto the printed page. It has been an interesting journey, and one which I feel the book has benefited from. At the heart of this post-apocalyptic tale is the story of a young girl struggling to find her place in the world. It is one I can identify with. The cleaver thing about this series is how it is set in the wake of the death of the Killjoys (which takes place in the band’s music videos). While reading this book and meeting the other gangs in the desert, such as the Ultra-Vs, I couldn’t help but thinking about fandoms. The killjoys were idolised and people followed them and what they had stood for. They looked up to them as heros, which mirrors many peoples experiences of bands such as My Chemical Romance. The girl in the book however knew them and remembers them more as friends. The way the members of the ultra-vs are hyper fashion conscious and seemed to do things because it was cool, and how they gave the girl a make over to fit in better, reminded me a lot of the culture that surrounds music (for good and for bad). There stories of the other characters in the world were also really captivating especially that of the androids. I loved the new dimension given to the people who work for BLI, like Korse. I felt more for him in his short story line in this book, than I have fore some characters in great big arching stories. But overall, this book is about finding closure and wrapping things up. About bringing things to an end. I can’t help but wonder how this reads to an outsider to the world. I wonder if it would be as fulfilling a read.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Regitze

    I cannot give this collection anything other than five stars. I've been a MCR fan for years, yet I havne't read this graphic novel until just now. I found that having listened to the album 'Danger Days' countless numbers of times in the past years as well as having watched the music videos for "Na Na Na" and "SING", I was already quite immersed in this world and unlike some reviews I've come acros, I didn't find the story to be inconsistent or flat. Rather I was quite unable to stop turning the I cannot give this collection anything other than five stars. I've been a MCR fan for years, yet I havne't read this graphic novel until just now. I found that having listened to the album 'Danger Days' countless numbers of times in the past years as well as having watched the music videos for "Na Na Na" and "SING", I was already quite immersed in this world and unlike some reviews I've come acros, I didn't find the story to be inconsistent or flat. Rather I was quite unable to stop turning the pages. Whenever I wasn't pouring over the pages and the images to discover and revel in the details. I havne't read that many graphic novels, but I am sure this won't be my lasst. I don't think this Killjoy-triangle, the album, the music videos and the comic, take anything from each other. In stead I found that they sort of give a lot to each other back and forth and I am honestly so happy I read this - finally. And it was definitely an experience reading this while listening to the 'Danger Days' album. It's a little hard for me to seperate the stories of the album, the videos and the comic completely, but I really loved the story of True Lives ... and the artwork just added to the whole-ness of the universe and the story of the Killjoys, the B.L.I. and the Girl. I really don't know what to say except that I loved it. I love it. Reviewed on my blog Bookish Love Affair.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    A little bit disjointed, but a great addition to the album. Now if you excuse me, I'm going to go listen to Danger Days on repeat for a few days.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

    They saved you... but I could have saved them. I'm sorry I wasn't there. Dying never hurts anyone except those left behind. - Cherri ColaHow do I explain The True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys? I guess something I need to say is that Danger Days is one of my all time favourite albums and I've always adored the M/Vs for Na Na Na and Sing. The storytelling in them made me happy as a teen. In the message from author Shaun Simon, he reveals that My Chemical Romance ran out of money to make a They saved you... but I could have saved them. I'm sorry I wasn't there. Dying never hurts anyone except those left behind. - Cherri ColaHow do I explain The True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys? I guess something I need to say is that Danger Days is one of my all time favourite albums and I've always adored the M/Vs for Na Na Na and Sing. The storytelling in them made me happy as a teen. In the message from author Shaun Simon, he reveals that My Chemical Romance ran out of money to make a third video for the album this was their way of continuing the story. The comic was thought of long before the two M/Vs, initially discussed sometime around 2008 Danger Days came out in 2010.I honestly don't know how good this comic would be to someone who didn't know the background, the album. It's not necessarily required and key details are explained but it certainly helps. There are so many references like the radio, the MOUSEKAT mask and some of Dr Death Defying broadcasts, he is the first person to speak and I read the text in his voice. The story follows The Girl from the M/Vs picking up a few years later as she walks into a store and finds Party Poison's mask for sale. The gist of the plot is her finding out why the men who died for her died for her and discovering her place in the world. All while running into core characters from the M/Vs and ending the story they start.Becky Cloonan has done great work with the art, ageing up The Girl while still looking enough like Grace Jeanette (the actress from Sing and Na Na Na) to be clearly the same character. Korse is given a storyline by Gerard Way and Shaun Simon that makes him likeable (well ish, I mean he killed the Killjoys) but I appreciate the effort redemption arcs are always welcome. This really is a great deal of fun as a fan, though I did have to use Wikipedia to figure out who fits in where at some points (Cherri Cola specifically and they rewrote history with him a bit). Red and Blue have a heart-wrenching story.Essentially I think this is something that is for fans. It is good may be good enough to stand alone. But only MCR fans will really enjoy it (even if the timeline wasn't rewritten).My reading experience in a gif: (I had no idea who this was until like 20 minutes ago so but Mindless Self Indulgence meant nothing to 12/3 year old me.)

  20. 4 out of 5

    Peter Derk

    If you're looking for a person who likes crazy shit, like a giant robot being piloted by a hookerbot through a desert wasteland where punk rock kids blast vampires with NES zappers and go on crash diets to fit into slim pants before they stage a revolution on a dystopic city, I'm your huckleberry. But the stuff in between has to make a little more sense for me. The whole thing felt artsy, and that's cool, but I'm in my mid-30's now. I'm starting to value simple clarity in stories way more than If you're looking for a person who likes crazy shit, like a giant robot being piloted by a hookerbot through a desert wasteland where punk rock kids blast vampires with NES zappers and go on crash diets to fit into slim pants before they stage a revolution on a dystopic city, I'm your huckleberry. But the stuff in between has to make a little more sense for me. The whole thing felt artsy, and that's cool, but I'm in my mid-30's now. I'm starting to value simple clarity in stories way more than inventiveness, outrageousness, or mindfucks that require some explanation outside the narrative. Because the mind doesn't really get fucked if you don't know what the hell is going on. The mindfuck comes and goes and it doesn't even register because all the confusion has pre-fucked my mind. There's no mind left to fuck. When I was a younger man, I liked weird, experimental, artsy fiction. A lot. A story with an interesting structure could carry me pretty far. I just wanted to see if the creator could pull it off. But now it's like... It's like I used to love the idea of going out and having an adventure. Have some drinks, watch a shitty band, stay out until 4 AM and that was exciting because it was spontaneous and so on. But now, a night in is a lot more fun for me. It just is. The craziness is replaced with calm, and I gotta say, it makes the occasional craziness a lot more interesting. Tonight at the grocery store I saw what I am 100% certain was a woman wearing boy shorts, as in the style of underwear, as pants. Forget the debate about tights as pants, this lady was full-on in her underwear, and underwear that was displaying a lot. At the grocery store. Doing full shopping! It's not like she ran in for condoms or like duct tape and garbage bags or diapers or a 9-volt battery and you just know her smoke detector is going off, something that she just FUCKING NEEDED. She had regular-ass foods. PRODUCE. She stood around and picked out a bell pepper, calmly checking the different ones for freshness, in her underwear.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    The True Lives Of The Fabulous Killjoys is a graphic novel about an unnamed girl in the California desert, The twist is, it’s in the future and the desert is run by a dystopian city called Battery City. The people who are against Battery City’s strict laws live on the outskirts of the city and ”they call themselves the Killjoys” after the four original Killjoys who died trying to save the girl against the Better Life Industries (Workers in Battery City). Throughout the whole book the girl has The True Lives Of The Fabulous Killjoys is a graphic novel about an unnamed girl in the California desert, The twist is, it’s in the future and the desert is run by a dystopian city called Battery City. The people who are against Battery City’s strict laws live on the outskirts of the city and ”they call themselves the Killjoys” after the four original Killjoys who died trying to save the girl against the Better Life Industries (Workers in Battery City). Throughout the whole book the girl has this cat always following her and she likes the cat since her mother died fighting against the Better Life Industries and she was alone, so it was nice to have a companion. She woke up that morning to go to the abandoned motel to go get some food, just like most of the Killjoys would do. When she gets there, she meets a set of twins and their group who have the mask of Party Poison, one out the four original Killjoys. She missed being with them and tried to take the mask instead of the food but before she could get too far the gang stopped her and took it back. The girl starts to hang around them more and more and in the climax of the book when she finds out that her mother’s fighting spirit didn’t die how she thought it did, it traveled into her soul since she was pregnant at the time she died. The girl stood up against the Better Life Industries and blew it up freeing everyone and all the souls that were trapped in Battery City. When it shows her walking back to the motel, her mother finds her and they are reunited. My favorite part of the book is when you think she surrenders to Better Life Industries, but she really tricks the police and she blows up Battery City and she frees the living and the trapped souls. I recommend this to anyone who has listened to the album, Danger Days, by My Chemical Romance because the graphic novel is a continuation of the album and the story line makes so much more sense if you listened and watched the music videos.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Marc *Dark Reader of the Woods*

    Yeah... no. If you're going to create a tie-in/sequel to an album and music videos, maybe state that nature of the book in a preface, foreword or on the back cover, and not in the second afterword? This was a random pick-up at the library, so thankfully a free and extremely time-limited negative experience. The artwork was dandy. Good use of color, cool visual design, really cute kitty! As for the rest of it, I can only describe it as a mashup of post-apocalyptic and dystopian concepts from Tank Yeah... no. If you're going to create a tie-in/sequel to an album and music videos, maybe state that nature of the book in a preface, foreword or on the back cover, and not in the second afterword? This was a random pick-up at the library, so thankfully a free and extremely time-limited negative experience. The artwork was dandy. Good use of color, cool visual design, really cute kitty! As for the rest of it, I can only describe it as a mashup of post-apocalyptic and dystopian concepts from Tank Girl/Aeon Flux/Clockwork Orange/Burning Man, lacking any depth or cohesion, and seemingly written in a drug-fuelled haze in the desert. I don't think I would feel any differently even had I experienced the album and/or videos it follows.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Devann

    This is probably more of a 2.5 rounded up and I really really wish I liked it more. I think my main problems were that 1. I should have read it back when it first came out and 2. it seems to follow directly off of the end of the music videos that they put out for the Danger Days album and I never actually watched all of them because there was one that had like 11 parts and I was just like #I'm out lol. I mean you can pick up most of the story from context clues if you've seen the first few music This is probably more of a 2.5 rounded up and I really really wish I liked it more. I think my main problems were that 1. I should have read it back when it first came out and 2. it seems to follow directly off of the end of the music videos that they put out for the Danger Days album and I never actually watched all of them because there was one that had like 11 parts and I was just like #I'm out lol. I mean you can pick up most of the story from context clues if you've seen the first few music videos but I would imagine people who are not at all familiar with MCR or the Danger Days album would be INCREDIBLY confused by this story. I like the art and the general concept but between this and The Umbrella Academy I'm sorry to say that I don't care much for Gerard's comics. Pretty sad considering he is the whole reason I even started reading comics in the first place. I would recommend this to die-hard MCR fans but probably not anyone else.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Georgia Rose

    Only just read this after having this comic for ages. It gave me huge MCR Danger Day vibes mainly due to some lyrics that are included in speech and the comic being a continuation of the music videos. I have to be completely honest here though and I have to admit that I wasn’t that keen on the comic itself. The characters weren’t that well developed so I didn’t really care that much about them. The plot, for me, was a bit filmsy and all over the place. There wasn’t any backstory about BLI Only just read this after having this comic for ages. It gave me huge MCR Danger Day vibes mainly due to some lyrics that are included in speech and the comic being a continuation of the music videos. I have to be completely honest here though and I have to admit that I wasn’t that keen on the comic itself. The characters weren’t that well developed so I didn’t really care that much about them. The plot, for me, was a bit filmsy and all over the place. There wasn’t any backstory about BLI (Better Living Industries) other than it seems like a mega cooperation that is set to rule the city through control and fear. Just I don’t even know. The concept seems okay but it’s just not well executed. The characters were too mysterious for me, like I thought they would all be explained, but they weren’t. The only thing I enjoyed was the artwork.

  25. 4 out of 5

    maria.

    3.5 This made me miss My Chemical Romance during Danger Days era. I liked how it was linked to the album, all the references were really cool. The story was interesting but it wasn't really that well developed (but it was only six issues, so what can you expect?) It felt kinda rushed but it was still enjoyable.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Wings_Of_Freedom

    This comic was so good! I've been wanting to read it forever after becoming a fan of MCR and discovering it, and it didn't disappoint. It has such a creative, original plotline with a really unique art style and color scheme that adds to the feel of the whole comic. It was so well done and corresponds perfectly with Danger Days!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jana.

    listen im like 5 years late i'm aware...... but this was super fucking cool ahhh

  28. 4 out of 5

    k

    I!!! fucking love!!! the killjoys!!!!!!!!!

  29. 5 out of 5

    M.

    I really liked this! It brings back a lot of 2013 memories, why lie. The plot was a bit confusing to follow at first but, overall, this is really great, especially for MCR fans!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ashleigh

    I confess. I’d never read the Killjoys comic before now. It was twice as shiny.

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