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What Women Fear: Walking in Faith that Transforms

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A woman's faith in God is challenged by the first question Satan asks Eve in the Bible: "Did God really say you can’t eat from any tree in the garden?" That seed of doubt and the story it begins to unfold breed a concept of fear still haunting each of us on some level every day-the idea that our actions could ruin something beautiful, and God might not have control of A woman's faith in God is challenged by the first question Satan asks Eve in the Bible: "Did God really say you can’t eat from any tree in the garden?" That seed of doubt and the story it begins to unfold breed a concept of fear still haunting each of us on some level every day-the idea that our actions could ruin something beautiful, and God might not have control of things.  In What Women Fear, acclaimed writer and speaker Angie Smith admits, "fear is a major part of my testimony" and talks openly about her treatment for anxiety as a child. Giving a voice to the problem, she says, "I truly believe every single one of us struggles with some type of fear, whether it's fear of flying or fear of being 'found out.' Maybe you don’t worry about dying, but you get sick thinking about the fact that you might fail."  Rather than suggesting that those who truly love the Lord would never fear, Angie blends her own experiences with those of men and women from throughout Scripture to help us start dealing more effectively with these true, human emotions. Whether it’s a constant "What if?," a nagging fear of abandonment or betrayal, fear of your own or someone else’s death, fear of trusting God's plan, or even the fear that God's existence is a lie, Angie will walk you through stories of others who have simultaneously loved God and struggled with fear. Join Angie and discover how to let Jesus redeem this struggle as only He can, that He will be glorified, and you will be transformed!


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A woman's faith in God is challenged by the first question Satan asks Eve in the Bible: "Did God really say you can’t eat from any tree in the garden?" That seed of doubt and the story it begins to unfold breed a concept of fear still haunting each of us on some level every day-the idea that our actions could ruin something beautiful, and God might not have control of A woman's faith in God is challenged by the first question Satan asks Eve in the Bible: "Did God really say you can’t eat from any tree in the garden?" That seed of doubt and the story it begins to unfold breed a concept of fear still haunting each of us on some level every day-the idea that our actions could ruin something beautiful, and God might not have control of things.  In What Women Fear, acclaimed writer and speaker Angie Smith admits, "fear is a major part of my testimony" and talks openly about her treatment for anxiety as a child. Giving a voice to the problem, she says, "I truly believe every single one of us struggles with some type of fear, whether it's fear of flying or fear of being 'found out.' Maybe you don’t worry about dying, but you get sick thinking about the fact that you might fail."  Rather than suggesting that those who truly love the Lord would never fear, Angie blends her own experiences with those of men and women from throughout Scripture to help us start dealing more effectively with these true, human emotions. Whether it’s a constant "What if?," a nagging fear of abandonment or betrayal, fear of your own or someone else’s death, fear of trusting God's plan, or even the fear that God's existence is a lie, Angie will walk you through stories of others who have simultaneously loved God and struggled with fear. Join Angie and discover how to let Jesus redeem this struggle as only He can, that He will be glorified, and you will be transformed!

30 review for What Women Fear: Walking in Faith that Transforms

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan McPeters

    (Written by Michelle) I generally shy away from books written specifically for women by women. However, I purchased this book at a recent WOF Conference after sitting through several sessions with Angie Smith. This proved to be an amazing read that I would recommend to any lady who is struggling in the area of fear. I have read a few books on the subject of fear. Each proved to be helpful in the generalization of this area and how to conquer its hold in our lives. I greatly appreciated Angie's (Written by Michelle) I generally shy away from books written specifically for women by women. However, I purchased this book at a recent WOF Conference after sitting through several sessions with Angie Smith. This proved to be an amazing read that I would recommend to any lady who is struggling in the area of fear. I have read a few books on the subject of fear. Each proved to be helpful in the generalization of this area and how to conquer its hold in our lives. I greatly appreciated Angie's more direct approach, as she chose to tackle ten very specific fears. Each chapter focuses on a specific fear and a character study of a man or woman in the Bible who struggled with that specific fear. She draws her readers to dig deeper in Scripture and take another look at these Biblical accounts through the (as we sometimes forget...) every "real" eyes of various Bible characters, who struggled then, just as we do now. She then encourages us to take a closer look at our own hearts and align it with the promises that we know are in Scripture. As a fairly new author, I found her book surprisingly rich in content, well organized and engaging. Her own life story is also weaved throughout this book covering her life long struggle with crippling fear to facing one of her greatest fears, that of losing a child. Her insight and confidence in the Lord that she has gleaned from these struggles are very evident in her writing. After purchasing this book just last week, I have already recommended this book to several women I know who, like me, do face various fears in life. You will walk away challenged to assess your faith in "your" God. You will also walk away with an awakened sense of gratitude and reliance on the God Who will never leave you or forsake you.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jen B.

    I laughed. I cried. I breathed sighs of relief to not be the "only one" with one fear or another. I felt honored. I felt uplifted. I felt humbled, small, and victorious; all at once. Angie's writing is so personable, so real and raw, that it made me cling to every word, knowing they were coming from a woman that I could easily see as a confidant. Of course I had my favorite chapters, but they were tied to the chapters where I related the most, and some of them caught me off guard. This book I laughed. I cried. I breathed sighs of relief to not be the "only one" with one fear or another. I felt honored. I felt uplifted. I felt humbled, small, and victorious; all at once. Angie's writing is so personable, so real and raw, that it made me cling to every word, knowing they were coming from a woman that I could easily see as a confidant. Of course I had my favorite chapters, but they were tied to the chapters where I related the most, and some of them caught me off guard. This book allowed God to reveal things to me about myself that I needed to realize, but had no idea were lurking in the depths of my heart. It was a very freeing book for me. It is another I should probably come back to and re-read... maybe even annually.... for a while, at least. It was a book filled with grace and wisdom, which provided avenues for forgiveness and strength. I loved it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    This book was solidly ok. Smith relies a good bit on personal experience, as many authors writing for Christian women do, which I find irritating. She makes some really good points, and her last chapter on the fear of God is wonderful. If you've read her book I Will Carry You, some of this book will be repetitive.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    What I love about this book is that it is not a "here's how not to fear because fear is bad" kind of book. Each chapter is relatively short, yet so dense with significance that I found I could only process a chapter a day: -- The Question that Started the Questions -- Fear of the "What If..." -- Fear of Rejection, Abandonment, and Betrayal -- Fear of Being Found Out -- Fear of Failure -- Fear of Death -- Fear of My Past Catching Up With Me -- Fear of Not Being Significant -- Fear of God's Plan for My What I love about this book is that it is not a "here's how not to fear because fear is bad" kind of book. Each chapter is relatively short, yet so dense with significance that I found I could only process a chapter a day: -- The Question that Started the Questions -- Fear of the "What If..." -- Fear of Rejection, Abandonment, and Betrayal -- Fear of Being Found Out -- Fear of Failure -- Fear of Death -- Fear of My Past Catching Up With Me -- Fear of Not Being Significant -- Fear of God's Plan for My Life -- Fear the God Isn't Real -- Fear of God (Contrary to the title, these fears are not exclusive to women; men would benefit from reading this as well.) Angie Smith is honest, relatable, and gently instructive as she parallels stories from her own life as well as life stories of both men and women from the Bible-- Jonah, Gideon, Peter, the bleeding woman, Mary Magdalene, Hagar-- to illustrate that while it is true that there are many instances in His Word where He tells us not to be afraid and not to be fearful, God does not disdain us for harboring fear. It's not like He tut-tuts each time I express anxiety or worry or uncertainty; if anything, the recurring pattern through each chapter was less about the fear itself (and its various manifestations) than it was about how God prevailed and over and through each fear. Reading this book will not change your life overnight; it makes no promise to help you wake up without fear-- in fact, the author argues that that is not the point. It will, however, reshape how you consider the role of fear in your life, and hopefully Angie's encouragement and her own courage will help to point you back to God, fears and doubts hand in hand with joy and confidence.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lenore Webb

    "What Women Fear" from Angie Smith. This one hits home because I live in fear most of the time. The self doubting of myself. I do not know if this is just from my mental illness that I am always worried about what I do and how others perceive my actions. Or just my messed up, oh my goodness what am I going to do fears. But I do bet that most of us do just this at one time or the other. Angie Smith does hit the nail on the head for me here though. So many have said to just hand it over to God and "What Women Fear" from Angie Smith. This one hits home because I live in fear most of the time. The self doubting of myself. I do not know if this is just from my mental illness that I am always worried about what I do and how others perceive my actions. Or just my messed up, oh my goodness what am I going to do fears. But I do bet that most of us do just this at one time or the other. Angie Smith does hit the nail on the head for me here though. So many have said to just hand it over to God and all fears will go away. But I do like that Angie knows it is not just that easy. That there is work to be done on our part to let go of fears. And she is willing to give ideas of how to do it. Whether it’s a constant “What if?,” or a nagging fear of abandonment or betrayal, Angie will walk you through every step and reveal how these strongholds can be broken and you can truly be transformed.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    I was frankly a little surprised by the depth in this book. The author struggles with anxiety herself which makes the book very real also. I especially appreciated her obvious love for the Lord and His Word. I think this book is a helpful Bible-based discussion of fear for the average woman, like me, who fights various types of fear, as well as the woman who struggles with full-fledged anxiety on a deeper level.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Moreno

    I wish I could give this book stars! I didn’t think I really had any issues with fear but know this is a good author so I participated in a group study. I found this book really ministered to me, whether or not I struggle with fear. There were some great chapters to share with hurting friends. I loved how each chapter used one or more Bible stories to demonstrate how God works in the midst of our fears. I highly recommend this book to all women. Read it from cover to cover!!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tricia Culp

    I thought this was a very accessible, thoughtful, helpful take on the different fears we face and how to combat them/ease them with faith and a deeper understanding of God. Smith has struggled with crippling fears since childhood, and its clear that her take on things comes from personal struggle and weakness, so it never feels preachy or trite. She addresses 9 common fears, like fear of failure (and success), fear of loss, and doubt (fear the God isn't real). For anyone who is dealing with fear I thought this was a very accessible, thoughtful, helpful take on the different fears we face and how to combat them/ease them with faith and a deeper understanding of God. Smith has struggled with crippling fears since childhood, and its clear that her take on things comes from personal struggle and weakness, so it never feels preachy or trite. She addresses 9 common fears, like fear of failure (and success), fear of loss, and doubt (fear the God isn't real). For anyone who is dealing with fear or wants to help people who do.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jackie Hewitt sutton

    Life changing This book is was a book that blessed me in so many ways. There was humor that had me laughing out loud, transparency that I have never before encountered in a writer, and a whole lot of epiphanies that have changed some of my perspectives forever. I will read this again and again- I believe there are so many more morsels to be unwrapped and savored. May God bless Angie for sharing he story.

  10. 5 out of 5

    MaryAnn

    This book was very readable and made lots of good points. But I thought she dealt too much in vague generalities and used a lot of "Christian-eeze" language to explain herself. She's only in her 30s and although she's been through a lot and has considerable wisdom for her age, her youth still shows. I debated between 3 or 4 stars -- I really would recommend it, but with some caveats.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    The first chapter was gripping and got me very excited. Even though the theology is different than my own I thought it would be a good jumping off point for study. I especially liked the chapter on Hagaar and Sarah. Unfortunately, the magic wore off. It seemed like the book turned into the author having every tragedy or malady under the sun and I just quit relating with her "Poor me's"

  12. 5 out of 5

    Heather {JoshuasGirl.com}

    This book spoke to my heart on so many levels. I love how she shares personal experiences along with Biblical stories to illustrate her points. Learning to let go of fear is something we all struggle with at some point...and this book is a perfect tool to help you along the way.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ashleigh

    love Angie Smith. This was great for me to read. To break down our fears in to pieces.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Carrie Peacock

    Absolutely LOVED this book and have since read it 3 more times and loaned it out a few times as well! I love Angie’s writing style - she’s humorous, sentimental, emotional and full of biblical truth in every chapter...as someone who has struggled with fear my entire life this book opened my eyes to the roots of my fears and how God tells us how to handle them.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jan

    I actually like this book. I was very encouraged and felt that it was personal. I like how she engages the reader in ways that is comforting and assuring. After reading the book, I understand that my fears shouldn't define the way I perceive as a woman. But rather is something that brings me to greater trust and awe in God whom deserves our fear. I didnt see it in this way until now.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ariel

    This came highly recommended, and I did enjoy it. I'm not sure that I struggle with all these fears, but in every chapter there were good points that I highlighted. I felt like this was a true representation of the most common fears, for sure. It's good writing, and sound doctrine.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Morgan Wilson

    Great book! I loved Angie Smith’s authenticity and courage to share the depths of her fears. This book opened up a dialogue about many of the fears that I keep suppressed and hidden and in turn, provided encouragement and had me looking back to the Lord.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Peggi Tustan

    An encouraging book for those who struggle with fear and anxiety. She skillfully wove scriptural accounts and personal accounts through each type of fear. She concluded with a chapter on good fear--the fear of the Lord. I read this book for mentoring. I recommend it.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Chianna

    The last three chapters were my faves. She writes in a way that is relatable and retainable.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Angie

    I enjoyed the author’s personality that infused the book and made it very relatable.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I’ve picked it up and put it down but always learned something from it. It’s easy to read and uses Scripture appropriately.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Denise

    This whole book was very good. In my opinion, if it was only chapter 5, Wind and Waves, it would have been worth reading.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Angelique

    I didn't realize this was the author's first book. I enjoyed it immensely. Going to read Mended next.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Nora St Laurent

    I bought this book and then then purchased the audio book when I saw it on sale. I liked having both. I could highlight items in the book I wanted to remember and pray about. The audio book helped me to focus and pray about things on my way to work. Angie Smith talks about walking in faith that transforms. When I think back to my childhood, there is so much joy and love. Despite this, there is a haunting feeling of fear I carried with me into adulthood. My parents did everything they could to I bought this book and then then purchased the audio book when I saw it on sale. I liked having both. I could highlight items in the book I wanted to remember and pray about. The audio book helped me to focus and pray about things on my way to work. Angie Smith talks about walking in faith that transforms. When I think back to my childhood, there is so much joy and love. Despite this, there is a haunting feeling of fear I carried with me into adulthood. My parents did everything they could to help me, but to this day fear is a major part of my testimony. I won’t say I feel qualified to tell you I have all the answers, nor will I promise that you will miraculously be cured of your anxiety by the time you reach the end of this book. What I will say is that I hope I am an encouraging companion to you as we go; a sister who understand your pain and the desire to live a life free of it. Free from the bondage fear can have on a sShe continues, I truly believe that every single one of us struggles with some type of fear, whether its fear of flying or fear of being found out. Maybe you don’t worry about dying but you get sick thinking about the fact that you might fail. Throughout scripture we have the opportunity to meet some amazing men and women whose stories remind us that we aren’t alone, and that our fears and struggles are not unknown to God these people from the pages of the bible have become friends to me over the years. I look to them for advice on how other people have death with true, human emotions. Some of them failed miserably. Honestly that kind of takes the pressure off feeling like I might be the first one to simultaneously love God and feel like I’m disappointing him. I liked Angie Smiths transparency and encouragement as she helps readers get to know bible characters and their struggles. She has a way with helping readers apply the scripture principle to everyday life. I liked that. Each chapter starts with a Bible story example Adam and Eve, Rachel, Jacob and Leah, Abraham, Sarah, Hagar and Ishmael. She convey the story and then tells readers how the passage affected her, then tells how she applied the lesson to her life. Below are some of the fears this author talks about: Fear of What if Fear of Rejection, Abandonment, and Betrayal Fear of being found out Fear of Failure Fear of Death Fear of my Past Catching up with me Fear of Not Being Significant Fear of Gods Plan for My Life Fear God Isn't Real She has a prayer at the end of each chapter as well. Here is one of them. May we believe in You and your love for us enough to believe you did not create us to live a life shadowed by the feeling we are inadequate. You long for us to call out in our weakness to those who will take us by the hand, leading us until we find you. Lord, bless us with friends and family who will carve a safe place for our confessions, and will love us in a way that is worthy of you. This is a book you’ll read again and again. It caused me to go back to scripture and look at it differently. You’ll ask God (like I did) to help you see something in there to apply to your situation. This makes a great read and/or a book club pick. Disclosure of Material Connection: I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising” Nora St Laurent TBCN Where Book Fun Begins www.bookfun.org The Book Club Network blog www.psalm516.blogspot.com Book Fun Magazine www.bookfunmagazine.com

  25. 4 out of 5

    Whitney

    Upon introduction I was hesitant to purchase because I assumed it would discuss anxiety or paranoia type fears. I was quickly proven incorrect. The content of the book discusses matters relatable to any woman. Though the author has a background that includes a master degree in Developmental Psychology it isn’t apparent that the work is driven by a desire to construct a self-help book based on her studies. Nor it is intended to be an in-depth theological study. It is more appropriately the Upon introduction I was hesitant to purchase because I assumed it would discuss anxiety or paranoia type fears. I was quickly proven incorrect. The content of the book discusses matters relatable to any woman. Though the author has a background that includes a master degree in Developmental Psychology it isn’t apparent that the work is driven by a desire to construct a self-help book based on her studies. Nor it is intended to be an in-depth theological study. It is more appropriately the exploration of the balance of faith and fear on a daily basis. I believe the heart of the work can be seen when she says: I long to be a woman who walks in the moment God has given me, with full confidence in what's to come. I know it isn't always going to look the way I want it to, but I long to internalize the fact that He is never going to forsake me or take His hands off me (page 26). Smith’s writing is clear and easy to comprehend while also often displaying her joyous sense of humor. She writes as though speaking directly with her audience in the tone of intimate friendship. Smith gains the trust of the reader through her retelling of personal experiences with each area. Readers are then drawn in further by her ease and relevance of discussion. Each chapter begins with a reference to wisdom gained from a Biblical story. The Bible is frequently quoted as passages or as individual verses and are the mediums through which her exploration of fear are conducted. At no point does she deliver a definitive conclusion to any area of fear, but rather encourages the reader to find balance in the matter through a walk with God. Each chapter focuses on specific areas of fear such as: “What if..,” rejection, abandonment, betrayal, failure, success, death, past becoming present, insignificance, God’s plan, realism of God, and fear of God himself. Angie Smith does an excellent job at demonstrating Biblical wisdom as is applicable to daily living in a fresh and tangible way. The writing exposes a new way of considering many of the familiar Biblical passages. As I read I was compelled to underline, highlight and comment in the margins extensively. I spent my time savoring the heart of the message she conveyed in each chapter. I genuinely did not find a single chapter I did not mark and find value in. In reviews of the book that I could find, only one out of more than a hundred reviews was negative. A strong response such as that speaks accurately well of such a great piece of writing. I would highly recommend What Women Fear by Angie Smith. In one word- phenomenal.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mmtimes4

    A woman's faith in God is challenged by the first question Satan asks Eve in the Bible: "Did God really say you can’t eat from any tree in the garden?" That seed of doubt and the story it begins to unfold breed a concept of fear still haunting each of us on some level every day-the idea that our actions could ruin something beautiful, and God might not have control of things. In What Women Fear, acclaimed writer and speaker Angie Smith admits, "fear is a major part of my testimony" and talks A woman's faith in God is challenged by the first question Satan asks Eve in the Bible: "Did God really say you can’t eat from any tree in the garden?" That seed of doubt and the story it begins to unfold breed a concept of fear still haunting each of us on some level every day-the idea that our actions could ruin something beautiful, and God might not have control of things. In What Women Fear, acclaimed writer and speaker Angie Smith admits, "fear is a major part of my testimony" and talks openly about her treatment for anxiety as a child. Giving a voice to the problem, she says, "I truly believe every single one of us struggles with some type of fear, whether it's fear of flying or fear of being 'found out.' Maybe you don’t worry about dying, but you get sick thinking about the fact that you might fail." Rather than suggesting that those who truly love the Lord would never fear, Angie blends her own experiences with those of men and women from throughout Scripture to help us start dealing more effectively with these true, human emotions. Whether it’s a constant "What if?," a nagging fear of abandonment or betrayal, fear of your own or someone else’s death, fear of trusting God's plan, or even the fear that God's existence is a lie, Angie will walk you through stories of others who have simultaneously loved God and struggled with fear. Join Angie and discover how to let Jesus redeem this struggle as only He can, that He will be glorified, and you will be transformed!GR description Outstanding book. At times I felt like she had crawled inside me and put to words my thoughts, my emotions and my fears. Such a powerful honest look at what things are feared and how to recognize them and conquer them. I loved her use of humor and transparency.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey Stefan

    Angie Smith’s book What Women Fear looks at her own deep-seeded fears in light of the Bible and a relationship with a heavenly Father. Each fear is connected to someone from the Bible. Fear of the what if correlates with Hagar, who wondered if she could have done something different to keep her son safe with his father instead of dying out in the desert. She is so consumed with fear that she doesn’t even see the well that God has provided to save him. Job has fears of rejection, abandonment and Angie Smith’s book What Women Fear looks at her own deep-seeded fears in light of the Bible and a relationship with a heavenly Father. Each fear is connected to someone from the Bible. Fear of the what if correlates with Hagar, who wondered if she could have done something different to keep her son safe with his father instead of dying out in the desert. She is so consumed with fear that she doesn’t even see the well that God has provided to save him. Job has fears of rejection, abandonment and betrayal when his wife and friends tell him that God has left him and he should curse his maker. Jonah fears what God has planned for his life and that it will not match his own plans. The most striking chapter concerns Peter walking on the waves towards Jesus. Smith writes about doubt, our fear that God isn’t who he says he is or doesn’t have the power to fulfill his promises. “I don’t think it’s possible to live this life without room for doubt. And even more shockingly, I don’t think God holds it against us. After all, if He wanted us to know we could walk on water, I think He would have designed us to do it.” You can tell with each sentence that Smith really wants to help her readers find faith in spite of their fear, instead of being paralyzed by it. She believes that we can all find balance on this tightrope of life, that “the more we tap into a life balanced by Christ, grounded in knowing Him and His Word, the less we have to worry about falling off. It’s still scary up here, no question, but if we can get a firm grip on that which steadies us, it will look different.”

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    She talks about dealing with fear and growing in faith, using personal and Biblical examples . Here is the chapter breakdown: The Question that Started the Questions Fear of the "What If..." Fear of Rejection, Abandonment, and Betrayal Fear of Being Found Out Fear of Failure Fear of Death Fear of My Past Catching Up With Me Fear of Not Being Significant Fear of God's Plan for My Life Fear the God Isn't Real Fear of God I could really relate to many of these chapters. I most connected with fear of She talks about dealing with fear and growing in faith, using personal and Biblical examples . Here is the chapter breakdown: The Question that Started the Questions Fear of the "What If..." Fear of Rejection, Abandonment, and Betrayal Fear of Being Found Out Fear of Failure Fear of Death Fear of My Past Catching Up With Me Fear of Not Being Significant Fear of God's Plan for My Life Fear the God Isn't Real Fear of God I could really relate to many of these chapters. I most connected with fear of not being significant and fear of rejection. I appreciated her honesty in fearing God isn't real. She gently calls us out of hiding to face ourselves and a God who loves us despite our fears. There are highlights and notes in almost every chapter. The last chapter talks about how we don't need to be afraid of God but we are supposed to fear Him--it helped me process many thoughts regarding this seeming confusion. Interestingly enough, my pastor spoke on it today right after I finished reading the chapter. I love how God connects things like that for me. I have already recommended the book to a couple of friends.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Jo

    I'm all about fear... Dont want to be... but I am. Afraid of flying - afraid of heights - afraid of suffocating But then there's the big ones - the fear of the unknown, the fear of what lays ahead, the fear of dying... all things that just show we're not in control of our lives. I have a hard time with books that are like 'self help' books - they dont hold my attention... but I will say - I really liked this one. Angie Smith had a way of showing the fear honestly in her life... & so many times, I'm all about fear... Dont want to be... but I am. Afraid of flying - afraid of heights - afraid of suffocating But then there's the big ones - the fear of the unknown, the fear of what lays ahead, the fear of dying... all things that just show we're not in control of our lives. I have a hard time with books that are like 'self help' books - they dont hold my attention... but I will say - I really liked this one. Angie Smith had a way of showing the fear honestly in her life... & so many times, I was sitting shaking my head, knowing exactly what she was saying. She'd then tie it right to a Biblical story - a person who also experienced fear in their life... & had Jesus/God right there to help them through. I ended up sitting there reading this, while marking up my bible to remember some of the points Angie made. I definitely marked up some points that I know I'll have issues with again down the road of life & I'll want to remmeber what the bible says about it...this book will read again.. & again.. & again.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Norm Konzelman

    I Peter 3:7 "Likewise, ye husbands, dwell with them according to knowledge, giving honour unto the wife, as unto the weaker vessel, and as being heirs together of the grace of life; that your prayers be not hindered." I wanted to know the answer to the title. To see what it was they feared. I have to assume what the author states is just that, and I was completely surprised to know that it is pretty much what men fear too. It seems our condition really is human. Now I have to say they might use I Peter 3:7 "Likewise, ye husbands, dwell with them according to knowledge, giving honour unto the wife, as unto the weaker vessel, and as being heirs together of the grace of life; that your prayers be not hindered." I wanted to know the answer to the title. To see what it was they feared. I have to assume what the author states is just that, and I was completely surprised to know that it is pretty much what men fear too. It seems our condition really is human. Now I have to say they might use more words and in a "fluffy" sweeter way, but not a lot different than anyone. Except that, they're completely different than men. A good thing :) The author seems to have an fairly accurate grasp of God's word as far as she took it. It is an encouragement. It was to me, and I expect it would be to you too. I recommend the book.

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