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The Tale of Benjamin Bunny

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The Tale of Benjamin Bunny is a sequel to The Tale of Peter Rabbit. The story tells of Peter's return to Mr. McGregor's garden with his cousin Benjamin to retrieve the clothes he lost there during his previous adventure. Finding Peter's clothes is easy, but their escape proves most difficult. In The Tale of Benjamin Bunny, Beatrix Potter deepened the rabbit universe she The Tale of Benjamin Bunny is a sequel to The Tale of Peter Rabbit. The story tells of Peter's return to Mr. McGregor's garden with his cousin Benjamin to retrieve the clothes he lost there during his previous adventure. Finding Peter's clothes is easy, but their escape proves most difficult. In The Tale of Benjamin Bunny, Beatrix Potter deepened the rabbit universe she created in The Tale of Peter Rabbit, and, in doing so, suggested the rabbit world was parallel to the human world but complete and sufficient unto itself. The Tale of Benjamin Bunny was written for a young audience, who are not quite ready to go out on their own. This edition is limited to 1,000 copies.


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The Tale of Benjamin Bunny is a sequel to The Tale of Peter Rabbit. The story tells of Peter's return to Mr. McGregor's garden with his cousin Benjamin to retrieve the clothes he lost there during his previous adventure. Finding Peter's clothes is easy, but their escape proves most difficult. In The Tale of Benjamin Bunny, Beatrix Potter deepened the rabbit universe she The Tale of Benjamin Bunny is a sequel to The Tale of Peter Rabbit. The story tells of Peter's return to Mr. McGregor's garden with his cousin Benjamin to retrieve the clothes he lost there during his previous adventure. Finding Peter's clothes is easy, but their escape proves most difficult. In The Tale of Benjamin Bunny, Beatrix Potter deepened the rabbit universe she created in The Tale of Peter Rabbit, and, in doing so, suggested the rabbit world was parallel to the human world but complete and sufficient unto itself. The Tale of Benjamin Bunny was written for a young audience, who are not quite ready to go out on their own. This edition is limited to 1,000 copies.

30 review for The Tale of Benjamin Bunny

  1. 4 out of 5

    Paul Bryant

    The tale of Benjamin Bunny as retold by Quentin Tarantino: "Bring out the bunny." "But the bunny's asleep." "Well you'd best go wake him up then ."

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jojo

    This book is the fourth in Potter's Peter Rabbit series. Benjamin bunny has never been my favourite character in these books, but I quite enjoyed the read. I love Potter's wit and her incredibly cute style of writing. You seriously can't help but smile when reading it! Something that completely gets me everytime when reading these books, are the beautiful illustrations. They make the books, in my opinion. They are intricate, and so thoughtful, and it was definitely another one of Potter's This book is the fourth in Potter's Peter Rabbit series. Benjamin bunny has never been my favourite character in these books, but I quite enjoyed the read. I love Potter's wit and her incredibly cute style of writing. You seriously can't help but smile when reading it! Something that completely gets me everytime when reading these books, are the beautiful illustrations. They make the books, in my opinion. They are intricate, and so thoughtful, and it was definitely another one of Potter's artistic strengths.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ronyell

    “The Tale of Benjamin Bunny” is the fourth book made in Beatrix Potter’s “Peter Rabbit” books and it is about how Peter’s cousin Benjamin convinces Peter to come to Mr. McGregor’s garden to get Peter’s clothes back. “The Tale of Benjamin Bunny” is a truly memorable follow up to the classic tale “Peter Rabbit.” The book starts off with Benjamin Bunny watching Mr. and Mrs. McGregor going out for the day and he decided to get his cousin Peter to come along with him to Mr. McGregor’s garden to get “The Tale of Benjamin Bunny” is the fourth book made in Beatrix Potter’s “Peter Rabbit” books and it is about how Peter’s cousin Benjamin convinces Peter to come to Mr. McGregor’s garden to get Peter’s clothes back. “The Tale of Benjamin Bunny” is a truly memorable follow up to the classic tale “Peter Rabbit.” The book starts off with Benjamin Bunny watching Mr. and Mrs. McGregor going out for the day and he decided to get his cousin Peter to come along with him to Mr. McGregor’s garden to get Peter’s clothes back. Oh my goodness! Beatrix Potter has certainly outdone herself in this classic follow up to the ever popular children’s book “The Tale of Peter Rabbit.” Beatrix Potter’s writing is extremely cute and interesting as it details Peter and Benjamin’s adventures in Mr. McGregor’s garden. I loved how the role of “mischievous little troublemaker” is switched to Benjamin Bunny instead of Peter Rabbit as Peter is constantly shown as being afraid in ever image. Since I have read “ The Tale of Peter Rabbit,” I cannot really blame Peter for being so jumpy after the scare he had when he went to Mr. McGregor’s garden and I personally would have been scared too if I went back to a place that scared the daylights out of me. It was interesting seeing another character who was as naughty as Peter was and what made Benjamin into such an endearing character was that he remained optimistic about the situation. Beatrix Potter's illustrations are extremely cute as most of the main characters are animals. My favorite illustrations were of the mice cracking cherry stones as they look extremely realistic yet cute at the same time as they huddled up next to each other and looked so adorable eating the cherry stones. Overall, “The Tale of Benjamin Bunny” is a truly cute and wonderful classic tale from Beatrix Potter about the consequences of being naughty! I would recommend this book to children ages three and up since there is nothing inappropriate in this book. Review is also on: Rabbit Ears Book Blog

  4. 5 out of 5

    GoldGato

    Of all the Beatrix Potter books, this one is closest to modern life. Benjamin Bunny goes to visit his cousins who live with their single, widowed mother...who runs a shop selling rabbit-wool mittens she's knitted herself along with herbs and, ahem, "rabbit-tobacco". Benjamin is streetwise (unlike his cousin Peter) and knows the ins and outs of stealing. He is moving fast into a life of crime, but he doesn't reckon with his old man, known as Old Benjamin Bunny. Papa bunny is the Clint Eastwood of Of all the Beatrix Potter books, this one is closest to modern life. Benjamin Bunny goes to visit his cousins who live with their single, widowed mother...who runs a shop selling rabbit-wool mittens she's knitted herself along with herbs and, ahem, "rabbit-tobacco". Benjamin is streetwise (unlike his cousin Peter) and knows the ins and outs of stealing. He is moving fast into a life of crime, but he doesn't reckon with his old man, known as Old Benjamin Bunny. Papa bunny is the Clint Eastwood of his hood and kicks the butt of the local bully cat, while also delivering parental punishment to our Benjie Bunny. I love little Benjamin Bunny. He must have grown up to become an investment banker. Book Season = Year Round (boo-ya)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Stacy

    Peter Rabbit and his cousin Benjamin Bunny sneak into Mr. McGregor's garden again to retrieve Peter's clothes, but this time they manage to get out of there, along with some onions, after Benjamin's father finds them and frees them from a basket they were trapped in.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Gail

    Ah, this book made me glad I was reading them all in order of publication. This is book 4, and for the first time, characters from a previous books turn up! We learn a bit more about Peter Rabbit's widowed mother, for instance - she makes a living selling, among other things, rabbit tobacco (known as lavender to us oblivious humans!). Benjamin Bunny is Peter Rabbit's cousin, and even more mischievous than him. Peter is still unwell (and without clothes - wearing a hankerchief to hide his Ah, this book made me glad I was reading them all in order of publication. This is book 4, and for the first time, characters from a previous books turn up! We learn a bit more about Peter Rabbit's widowed mother, for instance - she makes a living selling, among other things, rabbit tobacco (known as lavender to us oblivious humans!). Benjamin Bunny is Peter Rabbit's cousin, and even more mischievous than him. Peter is still unwell (and without clothes - wearing a hankerchief to hide his nakedness!) from his escapades in Mr McGregor's garden. Benjamin Bunny gets straight to the point, and asks who's got his clothes. When Peter explains, Benjamin informs him that Mr McGregor is out for the day - very subtle way of suggesting they go retrieve the clothes! So off they go, despite the fact that poor Peter is poorly and now terrified of that garden! And then of course they have adventures, despite Mr McGregor being out for the day! I won't give away any spoilers but will mention that, gosh, Benjamin Bunny's dad is quite a fierce character - nowhere near as lenient as Peter Rabbit's mother!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Joey Woolfardis

    Benjamin Bunny is Peter Rabbit's cousin, and much like The Tale of Peter Rabbit , it is a short tale of bunnies sneaking in to Mr McGregor's garden. Whilst the illustrations are absolutely as delightful as ever, I found this particular story rather bland and dull. I have always imagine Peter Rabbit to be a wonderful, cheeky little rabbit, but it appears he is somewhat pathetic and timid, and perhaps just a little stupid. The story (unlike , which is developed, longer and more atmospheric than Benjamin Bunny is Peter Rabbit's cousin, and much like The Tale of Peter Rabbit , it is a short tale of bunnies sneaking in to Mr McGregor's garden. Whilst the illustrations are absolutely as delightful as ever, I found this particular story rather bland and dull. I have always imagine Peter Rabbit to be a wonderful, cheeky little rabbit, but it appears he is somewhat pathetic and timid, and perhaps just a little stupid. The story (unlike , which is developed, longer and more atmospheric than this one) is short and I didn't particularly enjoy it. I can't say much else: it was quite a disappointment, though I didn't feel any of the tweeness I felt with the first two of Beatrix's stories.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Noninuna

    The experience with audiobook helps tremendously! Discovering Ms Rosemary Leach's version of reading is one of the things I'm grateful for.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    my favourite little tales.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    Cute continuation of the Tale of Peter Rabbit. My daughter was disappointed that Mr. McGregor didn't make much of a showing in this one, but his cat did. Peter's naughty little cousin, Benjamin, decides that they need to rescue Peter's clothes from Mr. McGregor's garden. There really wasn't as much suspense in this one as Peter, but it was still as nice little story with beautiful pictures.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kaethe Douglas

    This is not my favorite Potter, although that hat on the cover is awesome. The little books are so adorable, though.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Abigail

    This is another one of my early childhood books i found and i loved it!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

    I particularly love the reappearance of Peter Rabbit in this charming tale.

  14. 5 out of 5

    siriusedward

    Lovely lovely book. A sweet story and lovely illustrations.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Leah

    Beatrix Potter is a charming story teller to little ones with sweet illustrations. I didn't know about Benjamin Bunny, and while it had a good enough resolution, it was sad to see little Peter Rabbit get strung along in mischief once more by his cousin. Ben was at ease the whole time confident in his mischief, but poor Peter was nervous and ready to leave and go straight home (as he should after his last time in the garden!). In the end Benjamin gets switched by his father for his naughtiness Beatrix Potter is a charming story teller to little ones with sweet illustrations. I didn't know about Benjamin Bunny, and while it had a good enough resolution, it was sad to see little Peter Rabbit get strung along in mischief once more by his cousin. Ben was at ease the whole time confident in his mischief, but poor Peter was nervous and ready to leave and go straight home (as he should after his last time in the garden!). In the end Benjamin gets switched by his father for his naughtiness and Peter Rabbit runs home again and his mother is just glad his coat and shoes are found and forgives him, and enjoys the onions his cousin stole from the garden. There is both the consequences (discipline for Benjamin Bunny) and grace extended to Peter Rabbit.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Saashya Rodrigo

    If I remember right, this book taught me what 'consequence' meant. After reading it years later, only now do I realize the humour in 'rabbit tobacco' being lavender. What could be cuter than that! That's proof that you're never too old for some Beatrix Potter classics! I think all children should be introduced to this series. It's simple and exciting and you'll always learn new words.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Calista

    I still love the art work and something about this one wasn't as fun for me. Peter did get his clothes back from the farmer. At the end of the 1st book he had lost them to the farmer's scarecrow. The artwork is still as marvelous and the story was good. It simply wasn't my favorite so far of Beatrix's books.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Hunter

    A brief glimpse at the illustrations takes me back to pre-school days. Beatrix Potter's amazing. Is it weird that I remember the texture and smell of the pages in the tiny hardbacks? I'm doing my best to get the kids hooked on these stories. We'll see.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Atsupui Dogbla

    This book shows children's behavior when left alone at home. There would be a cousin or friend that would put them in a certain situation they won't experience themselves. And they could get hurt if nobody around comes to their rescue.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Erica

    What a weird little story. I don't know if I've ever really read this story and understood what it was about. I read it again today, like really read it and I'm confused about the message and also why this was such a popular children's story.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    Reading to an engaged audience is wonderful. But when that audience keeps interrupting to talk about other books in the series, you do start to sympathise with Steven Moffat.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Christabelle

    Benjamin gives this five stars making it unanimous among my children. Oldest daughter loved the story and her younger sister adored the illustrations.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Clara

    “Little Benjamin did not very much want to see his Aunt.” Don't know why, but that line cracked me up lol! Anyway, I skipped the second and third stories (for now) to read this one and I much prefer Benjamin Bunny to Peter Rabbit! This tale is simply adorable and I adore the illustrations in it! I felt so bad to see Peter sitting alone, dressed in only a red handkerchief because he lost his clothes to Mr McGregor. I thought he would at least have another set at home! Little Benjamin was simply so “Little Benjamin did not very much want to see his Aunt.” Don't know why, but that line cracked me up lol! Anyway, I skipped the second and third stories (for now) to read this one and I much prefer Benjamin Bunny to Peter Rabbit! This tale is simply adorable and I adore the illustrations in it! I felt so bad to see Peter sitting alone, dressed in only a red handkerchief because he lost his clothes to Mr McGregor. I thought he would at least have another set at home! Little Benjamin was simply so mischievous while Peter was mostly terrified in this story, and I empathize with him, especially after the ordeal he went through. Mr Benjamin, on the other hand, was a feisty one haha!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Debalina

    Awww! Peter Rabbit looks so scared! It made me sad. But the Benjamin guys are a cool father-son duo. I am so glad that Peter got his clothes back, and a bit sad for the cat. And Mr. McGregor has such an amazing mystery to solve. I hope he calls Poirot. Happy reading! ^_^ :) :D

  25. 4 out of 5

    Henrieke

    For a short story for children, I really liked this book. Beatrix Potter knows how to write with style and she amused me by it. Also, the beautiful drawings of the just cute-looking animals helped to make the story come alive. Just very adorable! I might just buy and read more books by this remarkable authress and in due time, read them to my kids!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Katrina Lybbert

    This one has always been a favorite of mine.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rose English

    Book 13 of my Goodreads Challenge 2019 Original illustrations but new colour reproductions a beautiful and timeless childrens classic

  28. 5 out of 5

    Dhia Citrahayi

    Bunny... Bunny... Bunny... Bunny... ❤️❤️

  29. 4 out of 5

    Leigha

    I decided to do some rereads of Beatrix Potter. I loved them as a child, and still enjoy them as an adult.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    This is a sequel to The Tale of Peter Rabbit. Benjamin Bunny, with the aide of his cousin Peter Rabbit, implements a plan to retrieve Peter Rabbit's clothes left behind in Mr. McGregor's garden. Equally interesting is that--in a single sentence--the narrator is transformed from an omniscient presence to an embodied person who recalls meeting Peter Rabbit's mother who was selling rabbit wool-mittens and muffatees. Readers seeking a story about friendship, family, and working together should be This is a sequel to The Tale of Peter Rabbit. Benjamin Bunny, with the aide of his cousin Peter Rabbit, implements a plan to retrieve Peter Rabbit's clothes left behind in Mr. McGregor's garden. Equally interesting is that--in a single sentence--the narrator is transformed from an omniscient presence to an embodied person who recalls meeting Peter Rabbit's mother who was selling rabbit wool-mittens and muffatees. Readers seeking a story about friendship, family, and working together should be amused.

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