Hot Best Seller

The Dunwich Horror and Others

Availability: Ready to download

Contents: ix · H.P. Lovecraft and His Work · August Derleth · in 10 · In the Vault · ss The Tryout Nov ’25; Weird Tales Apr ’32 19 · Pickman’s Model · ss Weird Tales Oct ’27 33 · The Rats in the Walls · ss Weird Tales Mar ’24 53 · The Outsider · ss Weird Tales Apr ’26 60 · The Colour Out of Space · nv Amazing Sep ’27 89 · The Music of Erich Zann · ss The National Amateur Contents: ix · H.P. Lovecraft and His Work · August Derleth · in 10 · In the Vault · ss The Tryout Nov ’25; Weird Tales Apr ’32 19 · Pickman’s Model · ss Weird Tales Oct ’27 33 · The Rats in the Walls · ss Weird Tales Mar ’24 53 · The Outsider · ss Weird Tales Apr ’26 60 · The Colour Out of Space · nv Amazing Sep ’27 89 · The Music of Erich Zann · ss The National Amateur Mar ’22; Weird Tales Nov ’34 98 · The Haunter of the Dark · nv Weird Tales Dec ’36 121 · The Picture in the House · ss The National Amateur Jul ’19; Weird Tales Mar ’37 130 · The Call of Cthulhu [Inspector Legrasse] · nv Weird Tales Feb ’28 160 · The Dunwich Horror · nv Weird Tales Apr ’29 203 · Cool Air · ss Tales of Magic and Mystery Mar ’28; Weird Tales Jul ’27 212 · The Whisperer in Darkness · na Weird Tales Aug ’31 278 · The Terrible Old Man · vi The Tryout Jul ’20; Weird Tales Aug ’26 281 · The Thing on the Door-step · nv Weird Tales Jan ’37 308 · The Shadow Over Innsmouth · na Visionary Press: Everett, PA, 1936; Weird Tales Jan ’42 370 · The Shadow Out of Time · na Astounding Jun ’36


Compare

Contents: ix · H.P. Lovecraft and His Work · August Derleth · in 10 · In the Vault · ss The Tryout Nov ’25; Weird Tales Apr ’32 19 · Pickman’s Model · ss Weird Tales Oct ’27 33 · The Rats in the Walls · ss Weird Tales Mar ’24 53 · The Outsider · ss Weird Tales Apr ’26 60 · The Colour Out of Space · nv Amazing Sep ’27 89 · The Music of Erich Zann · ss The National Amateur Contents: ix · H.P. Lovecraft and His Work · August Derleth · in 10 · In the Vault · ss The Tryout Nov ’25; Weird Tales Apr ’32 19 · Pickman’s Model · ss Weird Tales Oct ’27 33 · The Rats in the Walls · ss Weird Tales Mar ’24 53 · The Outsider · ss Weird Tales Apr ’26 60 · The Colour Out of Space · nv Amazing Sep ’27 89 · The Music of Erich Zann · ss The National Amateur Mar ’22; Weird Tales Nov ’34 98 · The Haunter of the Dark · nv Weird Tales Dec ’36 121 · The Picture in the House · ss The National Amateur Jul ’19; Weird Tales Mar ’37 130 · The Call of Cthulhu [Inspector Legrasse] · nv Weird Tales Feb ’28 160 · The Dunwich Horror · nv Weird Tales Apr ’29 203 · Cool Air · ss Tales of Magic and Mystery Mar ’28; Weird Tales Jul ’27 212 · The Whisperer in Darkness · na Weird Tales Aug ’31 278 · The Terrible Old Man · vi The Tryout Jul ’20; Weird Tales Aug ’26 281 · The Thing on the Door-step · nv Weird Tales Jan ’37 308 · The Shadow Over Innsmouth · na Visionary Press: Everett, PA, 1936; Weird Tales Jan ’42 370 · The Shadow Out of Time · na Astounding Jun ’36

30 review for The Dunwich Horror and Others

  1. 5 out of 5

    J.L. Sutton

    HP Lovecraft’s tales are dominated by a mounting sense of dread; however, the amount of time he spends creating this atmosphere is often at odds with moving the narrative forward in an effective way. For me, that means I enjoy HP Lovecraft’s tales (and his mythos), but I haven’t always cared much for his writing. In Dunwich Horror, Lovecraft evokes a nameless, ancient terror without sacrificing the story. Once the Necronomicon is opened, our world becomes linked with the world of the Ancient HP Lovecraft’s tales are dominated by a mounting sense of dread; however, the amount of time he spends creating this atmosphere is often at odds with moving the narrative forward in an effective way. For me, that means I enjoy HP Lovecraft’s tales (and his mythos), but I haven’t always cared much for his writing. In Dunwich Horror, Lovecraft evokes a nameless, ancient terror without sacrificing the story. Once the Necronomicon is opened, our world becomes linked with the world of the Ancient Ones. Dunwich Horror is a satisfying and enjoyable read! This is not his most well- known work, but if you haven’t read any of Lovecraft’s stories before I would say this is a good place to start.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jack Tripper

    (Full review 1/19/17) 1978 Jove mass-market with cover art from the always excellent Rowena Morrill. This version of the book doesn't feature all the stories listed on this page (which is for the Arkham House editions). It includes: "In the Vault," Pickman's Model," "The Rats in the Walls," "The Music of Erich Zann," "The Haunter of the Dark," "The Dunwich Horror," and "The Thing on the Doorstep," most of which are top-tier Lovecraft, imo, ones I hadn't read in 20 years or so until now. It also (Full review 1/19/17) 1978 Jove mass-market with cover art from the always excellent Rowena Morrill. This version of the book doesn't feature all the stories listed on this page (which is for the Arkham House editions). It includes: "In the Vault," Pickman's Model," "The Rats in the Walls," "The Music of Erich Zann," "The Haunter of the Dark," "The Dunwich Horror," and "The Thing on the Doorstep," most of which are top-tier Lovecraft, imo, ones I hadn't read in 20 years or so until now. It also features an informative intro from 1963 by Arkham House co-founder August Derleth (or "Der Leth" as he's mistakenly called on the cover). I thought some of the tales would lose a little of that sense of awe (or "frisson," as weird fiction authority ST Joshi would say) I felt as a teen, but I was wrong. "Pickman's Model" was as effective (and horrifying) as ever, but "The Thing on the Doorstep," which closes the collection, especially creeped me out this time around, as it involves one of my biggest fears: the loss of one's own mind/loss of control. My appreciation for "Erich Zann" grew greatly as well, and is now one of my all-time favorite Lovecraft stories. It's not especially "scary," but it is straight-up weird -- very proto-Ligottian in a way, with its (now typical) strange, hidden "Ligotti-esque" town-- and is pretty much unlike anything else he's written, to my knowledge. The only stories that didn't really hold up as well for me were "In the Vault" (short, decent-but-standard graveyard horror) and the title story, which seemed much too long, written in that dry, overly clinical style that ole' HP sometimes used, and which I really have to be in the right mood for. Still, this a must-own for collectors of vintage Lovecraft paperbacks, and even the two tales that didn't really float my boat as much aren't bad by any means. 4.5 Stars.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    Wilbur Whateley is the offspring of an extreme interracial relationship. His mother is a FUGLY, deformed, inbred albino. She’s the more attractive set of chromosomes because "papa" is reeeeeeeeeeally FUBAR and quite a bit “elder.” This unnatural genetic bouillabaisse helps Wilbur sprout into an impressive 15 year old that stands over 8 feet tall, carries a full beard and has a face that can cure constipation. Yes….Wilbur is awesome. The Dunwich Horror is among my favorite Lovecraft stories and is Wilbur Whateley is the offspring of an extreme interracial relationship. His mother is a FUGLY, deformed, inbred albino. She’s the more attractive set of chromosomes because "papa" is reeeeeeeeeeally FUBAR and quite a bit “elder.” This unnatural genetic bouillabaisse helps Wilbur sprout into an impressive 15 year old that stands over 8 feet tall, carries a full beard and has a face that can cure constipation. Yes….Wilbur is awesome. The Dunwich Horror is among my favorite Lovecraft stories and is a central component of the Cthulhu mythos. Now keep in mind that I have a serious smitten on for HPL and so my reviews of his stories are coming from the perspective of someone who joys at his trademark brand of atmospheric melodrama and over the top descriptions of “nameless horrors.” I like his vivid, archaic prose and love that he might describe a swamp not as “spooky looking” but rather some "eldritch conglomerate of unholy components whose fetid stench radiated evil and whose appearance cried of unspeakable dread."** **Note: that this was my own attempt to emulate Lovecraft so don’t hold the above description against him. PLOT SUMMARY: The story is told as a historical recounting of the “Dunwich Horror” and takes place in a secluded Massachusetts town called...uh, Dunwich. The plot revolves around Wilbur’s unusual birth, his early development and indoctrination in the dark arts by his sorcerer grandpappy and his subsequent attempts to obtain an original Latin version of the dreaded Necronomicon. Wilbur needs the evil tome in order to perform a sinister ritual involving the “Old Ones” and the gatekeeper entity known as Yog-sothoth (pronounced just like it sounds but with a throat full of phlegm). HPL takes his time in this short novella and does a superb job of setting the mood with his description of Dunwich and the surrounding wilderness. The first few pages are evidence of the influence that Algernon Blackwood had on HPL’s writing as his depiction of the Dunwich valley as a malevolent, almost living presence, reads much like the beginning of Blackwood’s The Willows. When a rise in the road brings the mountains in view above the deep woods, the feeling of strange uneasiness is increased. The summits are too rounded and symmetrical to give a sense of comfort and naturalness, and sometimes the sky silhouettes with especial clearness the queer circles of tall stone pillars with which most of them are crowned….When the road dips again there are stretches of marshland that one instinctively dislikes, and indeed fears at evening when unseen whippoorwills chatter and the fireflies come out in abnormal profusion to dance to the raucous, creepily insistent rhythms of stridently piping bull-frogs. As the hills draw nearer, one heeds their wooded sides more than their stone-crowned tops. Those sides loom up so darkly and precipitously that one wishes they would keep their distance, but there is no road by which to escape them. It's descriptions like these, dripping with color commentary and emotional projection, that are helpful in separating the HPL lovers from those that find him full of ham, corn and cheese. I am certainly one of the former and get absolutely enrapt by his lush, vivid prose that just ooze atmosphere. HPL raises the creep level considerably when he begins to describe the inhabitants of Dunwich. As Lovecraft explains, …the natives are now repellently decadent, having gone far along the path of retrogression so common to many New England backwaters. They have come to form a race by themselves with well-defined mental and physical stigmata of degeneracy and inbreeding. The average of their intelligence is woefully low, whilst their annals reek of overt viciousness and of half-hidden murders, incests and deeds of almost unnameable violence and perversity. All I could think of while reading that was the pig-loving mountain men from Deliverance and now I’m gonna have nightmares of Ned Beatty squealing like a pig out of his very perdy mouth. Thanks HPL. This is classic Lovecraft and fans of his work should love this. If you've never read any of HPL’s work and are looking for a good place to start, you could do a lot worse than this story which provides some excellent background on the Cthulhu mythos and the “Old Ones.” 5.0 stars. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lyn

    Jerry, George, Elaine and Cthulhu are sitting in Jerry’s New York apartment discussing H.P. Lovecraft’s 1928 novella The Dunwich Horror. [Kramer bursts through the door] Kramer: Is Cthulhu still here, oh there you are. Wow, great honor your greatness. Cthulhu: Kramer! Good to see you my friend, come on in, we’re just talking some Dunwich Horror. Kramer: Yeah, I read it, and I’M LOVIN’ IT JERRY! Jerry: One of H.P.’s best, no doubt. George: What do you think of the Arkham references, Jerry? Jerry: Well, Jerry, George, Elaine and Cthulhu are sitting in Jerry’s New York apartment discussing H.P. Lovecraft’s 1928 novella The Dunwich Horror. [Kramer bursts through the door] Kramer: Is Cthulhu still here, oh there you are. Wow, great honor your greatness. Cthulhu: Kramer! Good to see you my friend, come on in, we’re just talking some Dunwich Horror. Kramer: Yeah, I read it, and I’M LOVIN’ IT JERRY! Jerry: One of H.P.’s best, no doubt. George: What do you think of the Arkham references, Jerry? Jerry: Well, it’s more Batman than Superman, but all good fun just the same. Cthulhu: Lovecraft’s introduction of Wilbur Whateley into the mythos was a stroke of inspired horrific genius, providing a link from the mundane to the cryptic and profane. Something to inspire dreams and nightmares. Jerry: I had a dream last night that a hamburger was eating me. George : And another story that includes the Necronomicon, a fantastic and arcane tome of forbidden lore. Jerry, just remember, it's not a lie if you believe it. Elaine: And his creepy family living back in the woods, interbreeding and carrying on, I mean – yuck! – And the old fiery rites and sacrificing bulls to Old Gods, for God knows how long. They were a very festive people. Kramer: If you're not gonna be a part of a civil society, then just get in your car and drive on over to the East Side. Jerry: Yeah, a little too much chlorine in that gene pool. Cthulhu: Lovecraft further explores his thematic homage to pre-historic deity. But I gotta tell you, those were some good times. Good times. Kramer: Here's to feeling good all the time. Cthulhu: Thanks Kramer, and I can appreciate your enthusiasm, but it really transcended just having a good time. And H.P. picked up on this, it was also about soul scrubbing horrors of an unspeakable and sanity defying nature. Elaine: Why does everything have to be so... horrific with you? 
 Cthulhu: I'm an Old God.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Joey Woolfardis

    I'm going to have to think up a name for a shelf on GoodReads for these types of books. They're not quite fantasy or sci-fi, not quite gothic and not quite wholly esoteric. Maybe just "Lovecraftian" will have to do... Much like his other works, this was sublimely written. The story seemed much more fleshed out and seemed to have a linear purpose beyond just being a short story about esoteric dealings and horrific things from the blackness etc If I weren't so lazy I'd look up the chronology of this I'm going to have to think up a name for a shelf on GoodReads for these types of books. They're not quite fantasy or sci-fi, not quite gothic and not quite wholly esoteric. Maybe just "Lovecraftian" will have to do... Much like his other works, this was sublimely written. The story seemed much more fleshed out and seemed to have a linear purpose beyond just being a short story about esoteric dealings and horrific things from the blackness etc If I weren't so lazy I'd look up the chronology of this story, which I imagine was written much later than the others I've read, simply because it reeks of advanced storytelling, and not the simple "ooh, and then this happens" kind of storytelling I've found in his others. My only consternation with this story is the rather trite Now Let That Be A Lesson To You dialogue that occurs towards the end, when Mr. Education defeats the monster and must chide the Backwater Idiots, verbally spanking them and making sure They Never Do It Again. No more interbreeding or incest, thank you. Look what happens when you do. Possible apocalypse, etc. Still bloody good, though. What an imagination. H.P. (or Brown Sauce as we like to call him) was magnificent, yet assuming like all great minds, really fucking fucked up.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jason Koivu

    After you're finished with The Call of Cthulhu and you feel as if you still have your senses about you (You think you do, but you don't. Good try though!), give The Dunwich Horror and Other Stories a go. Herein you'll find more possessed people and plenty others driven insane, as per usual. If nothing else, this is a wonderful foundational work on the Lovecraftian mythos that details in creepy color Cthulhu and that devilish book of magic, The Necronomicon. The language evoked by Lovecraft is After you're finished with The Call of Cthulhu and you feel as if you still have your senses about you (You think you do, but you don't. Good try though!), give The Dunwich Horror and Other Stories a go. Herein you'll find more possessed people and plenty others driven insane, as per usual. If nothing else, this is a wonderful foundational work on the Lovecraftian mythos that details in creepy color Cthulhu and that devilish book of magic, The Necronomicon. The language evoked by Lovecraft is more simplified here than it was in Call... or The Horror at Red Hook. Dunwich... often reads like an old-timey newspaper story. That style tends to distance the reader from the action, but this is an intentional device used to keep up the mystery. Perhaps some might call the writing stiff at times. Maybe a modern reader or two might find this too formal. Well, this was writing about 90 years ago. The fact is, this is still solidly spooky stuff. I'm thinking I should read Lovecraft every time Halloween comes around, if I dare...

  7. 4 out of 5

    Greg

    This is a cheat review, I didn't actually read this book. I read the story The Dunwich Horror and maybe this edition has only that story in it, or maybe it has some other ones included as well. I don't know. And this unknowing kind of disturbs me, and I think maybe I shouldn't review this as a book, but just tack it on to my review of The Weird. It almost fills with the horror that the citizens of Dunwich feel when they take turns looking up on the hill towards the end of this story. Yeah, it's This is a cheat review, I didn't actually read this book. I read the story The Dunwich Horror and maybe this edition has only that story in it, or maybe it has some other ones included as well. I don't know. And this unknowing kind of disturbs me, and I think maybe I shouldn't review this as a book, but just tack it on to my review of The Weird. It almost fills with the horror that the citizens of Dunwich feel when they take turns looking up on the hill towards the end of this story. Yeah, it's that serious and incomprehensible to rational thought. This is the most bearable of all the Lovecraft I've read. This isn't say too much, since I haven't read too much by him, but I didn't feel like throwing the book across the room at any point while reading it. The book did a decent job of ruining my Sunday though. This was my daily story I had to read from The Weird so I sat down to read it, and told myself that I'd make my way through it and then go on to more productive things, but instead I couldn't keep reading more than a couple of pages at a time before all sorts of banal things would seem more interesting and needing my attention than continuing to read. But I wouldn't let myself do anything actually productive or fun (not that I had any ideas for anything fun to do, but maybe I would have thought of something (No, I wouldn't have)). So I started the story around 10 am and sometime just shy of 4 pm I finished it. In that time I also started to read a Dan Simmons novel, read a chapter or two in The Remainder, watched snippets of Friday night's UFC on FX (which I also blame for my lethargic Sunday, what a bunch of boring fights, I couldn't watch more than about half a round before feeling the need to break the monotony with returning to Lovecraft or to do something else, like pick up pieces of paper on my floor or just sit on my bed and stare, it was a fun Sunday, it's a shame I didn't document it for look at what I do when Karen isn't around to orchestrate AIFAF. But, as much as the story didn't really hold my interest it didn't actively annoy me (maybe I was just easily distracted yesterday?) and I found the basic story to be pretty interesting. I thought ending (being the immediate build up to and the climax) to be suck but the build up and character development I enjoyed (which seems odd to say since I couldn't sit still long enough to get through much of it at a time). In theory I like the misanthropic qualities of the Old Gods, or Cthulu or whatever you want to call it (were the monsters in this books supposed to be even more baddass than Cthulu? I tried deciphering the passage where octopus face is mentioned but couldn't really make out what Lovecraft meant (am I just stupid? Probably), but every time he brings one of these creatures onto the page the reaction of people and the description (or non-description because they are so horrific that they just cause feinting and insanity among men) is a literary turn off for me. Fortunately the stories in this collection (that would be The Weird, not the rest of the stories in this Lovecraft book) should be leaving the era and style that Lovecraft is an example of. I have high hopes for most of the rest of this collection, but please no more unspeakable horrors.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Wanda

    6 OCT 2015 - Today was a very slow day at work. It happens sometimes. We are not permtted to read real books at our desks; so, I could not read the Narrow Road. Instead, we are permitted mobile devices. I downloaded The Dunwich Horror from Project Gutenberg and spent the day being scared out of my mind. Holy Mud! This is a spooky read. Here is your link to being frightened: https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/50133 Do NOT read before bedtime. You have been warned. Dagny and I shared our Lovecraft 6 OCT 2015 - Today was a very slow day at work. It happens sometimes. We are not permtted to read real books at our desks; so, I could not read the Narrow Road. Instead, we are permitted mobile devices. I downloaded The Dunwich Horror from Project Gutenberg and spent the day being scared out of my mind. Holy Mud! This is a spooky read. Here is your link to being frightened: https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/50133 Do NOT read before bedtime. You have been warned. Dagny and I shared our Lovecraft reading experience. I want to include it here. Dagny wrote: "I can still remember the first time I read a story by Lovecraft. It was back in the 70s and I thought it was the scariest story I had ever read." Exactly. There is such a build-up to the ending - excitement, tension. There are no wasted words. I love when an author makes words come to life and those alive words have the ability to create such strong emotions in the reader.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Bettie

    https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/50133 Opening: When a traveler in north central Massachusetts takes the wrong fork at the junction of the Aylesbury pike just beyond Dean's Corners he comes upon a lonely and curious country. The ground gets higher, and the brier-bordered stone walls press closer and closer against the ruts of the dusty, curving road. The trees of the frequent forest belts seem too large, and the wild weeds, brambles, and grasses attain a luxuriance not often found in settled https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/50133 Opening: When a traveler in north central Massachusetts takes the wrong fork at the junction of the Aylesbury pike just beyond Dean's Corners he comes upon a lonely and curious country. The ground gets higher, and the brier-bordered stone walls press closer and closer against the ruts of the dusty, curving road. The trees of the frequent forest belts seem too large, and the wild weeds, brambles, and grasses attain a luxuriance not often found in settled regions. At the same time the planted fields appear singularly few and barren; while the sparsely scattered houses wear a surprizing uniform aspect of age, squalor, and dilapidation. Without knowing why, one hesitates to ask directions from the gnarled, solitary figures spied now and then on crumbling doorsteps or in the sloping, rock-strewn meadows. Those figures are so silent and furtive that one feels somehow confronted by forbidden things, with which it would be better to have nothing to do. When a rise in the road brings the mountains in view above the deep woods, the feeling of strange uneasiness is increased. The summits are too rounded and symmetrical to give a sense of comfort and naturalness, and sometimes the sky silhouettes with especial clearness the queer circles of tall stone pillars with which most of them are crowned. This was a scary one. Must make an effort to read more from the Welsh author Arthur Machen. A month of Halloween 2015 reads: #1: 3* Nobody True by James Herbert: fraudio #2: TR The Horror Stories of Robert E. Howard: fraudio #3: 1* Brain Child by John Saul: fraudio #4: 3* Domain (Rats #3) by James Herbert: fraudio #5: CR The Mourning Vessels by Peter Luther: paperback #6: 2* The Doom of the Great City: ebook short-story #7: 5* Long After Midnight by Ray Bradbury: fraudio #8: 5* The Dead Zone by Stephen King: fraudio #9: TR The Chalice: hardback #10: TR Seven Gothic Tales: ebook #11: TR Tales of Men and Ghosts #12: 2* Shattered by Dean Koontz: fraudio #13: 5* The Dunwich Horror: e-book: gutenberg project

  10. 4 out of 5

    Maciek

    When a traveller in north central Massachusetts takes the wrong fork at the junction of the Aylesbury pike just beyond Dean’s Corners he comes upon a lonely and curious country. The Dunwich Horror is set in the isolated and derelict village of Dunwich, and is the story of an isolated and derelict family - the Whateleys. The story is centered around the youngest Whateley, Wilbur, who is a most unusual person - son of an albino mother and an unknown father, he grows up much faster than other When a traveller in north central Massachusetts takes the wrong fork at the junction of the Aylesbury pike just beyond Dean’s Corners he comes upon a lonely and curious country. The Dunwich Horror is set in the isolated and derelict village of Dunwich, and is the story of an isolated and derelict family - the Whateleys. The story is centered around the youngest Whateley, Wilbur, who is a most unusual person - son of an albino mother and an unknown father, he grows up much faster than other children, reaching maturity in just ten years. There are whispers of the Whateley grandfather strange and disturbing influence on the boy, as old Whateley constantly buys more and more cattle, having a seemingly unending amount of money - yet the size of his her never increases. The Whateley farm is also a topic of many hushed talks - there's an omen of a strange presence in the farmhouse, which the Whateleys keep rebuilding, and strange noises frighten infrequent visitors. The Dunwich Horror builds up slowly to the actual horror, which occurs at the very end; most of the novel focuses on the disintegration of the Whateley family, and the growing strangeness of young Wilbur. At fourteen Wilbur resembles a gargoyle rather than a man, and is universally hated by dogs; he has to buy a gun to be able to defend himself from them. Lovecraft's trademark Miskatonic University in Arkham makes an appearance as the place where young Wilbur ventures to study the infamous Necronomicon. The actual horror occurs at the end of the novel, and affects most of Dunwich in its grotesque monstrosity; it is notable that The Dunwich Horror remains one of the very few (if not only) Lovecraft stories where a group of heroes not only actively study the nature of said horror, but put up successful resistance against it. Still, the story lacks the intrigue and suspense of The Shadow Over Innsmouth, which I thought was much more engaging and enjoyable. As always with Lovecraft, you can freely and legally read this story online, or download a copy for your eReader.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    Dunwich claims a story, a “blasphemy” of a story. The Horror, the “blasphemy” came to the town as a boy named Wilbur Whately. At three little Wilbur could read with a profound intelligence, a prodigy, who looked twelve instead of three. The town produces strange phenomena, such as the whippoorwills; they move to a rhythm when people die. The birds sing in glee, and legend says they stop singing if they become discouraged at a person’s death. You see, the birds want to capture and torment that Dunwich claims a story, a “blasphemy” of a story. The Horror, the “blasphemy” came to the town as a boy named Wilbur Whately. At three little Wilbur could read with a profound intelligence, a prodigy, who looked twelve instead of three. The town produces strange phenomena, such as the whippoorwills; they move to a rhythm when people die. The birds sing in glee, and legend says they stop singing if they become discouraged at a person’s death. You see, the birds want to capture and torment that person’s soul. Wilbur wants to get his hands on “The Necronomicon,” an ancient book remembering a world before ours, an ancient world when the “Ancient Ones” once lived and ruled. Wilbur becomes obsessed and unlocks a portal with strange words, calling on an ancient entity of which Cthulhu has no contest. Portals become opened. The man becomes a beast, an inhuman, other-worldly beast, and he calls upon a foreign power invisible to the human eye, an entity from another dimension. “Oh, oh, my Gawd, that haff face – that haff face on top of it… that face with the red eyes an’ crinkly albino hair, an’ no chin, like the Whateley’s… It was a octopus, centipede, spider kind o’ thing, but they was a haff-shaped man’s face on top of it, an’ it looked like Wizard Wateley’s, only it was yards an’ yards acrost….” This story helps me see why Lovecraft has become the face of the Fantasy Award, why he has developed into a name evoking respect in the fantasy and horror fields. The short scared me and freaked me out. I loved it. I deeply respect the imagination of this man, and his ability to create other worlds and dimensionality.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jean-marcel

    This book was my first exposure to H. P. Lovecraft, way back in 1991 or so. I was eleven years old. The book shook my world to its very foundations. At the time, isaac Asimov was my favourite writer, but Lovecraft showed me how to appreciate moody, lapidary writing full of atmosphere and dripping with menace. I gave the book five stars mostly because of its revelatory impact on me and my personality, even though if I had discovered Lovecraft for the first time today, especially being familiar This book was my first exposure to H. P. Lovecraft, way back in 1991 or so. I was eleven years old. The book shook my world to its very foundations. At the time, isaac Asimov was my favourite writer, but Lovecraft showed me how to appreciate moody, lapidary writing full of atmosphere and dripping with menace. I gave the book five stars mostly because of its revelatory impact on me and my personality, even though if I had discovered Lovecraft for the first time today, especially being familiar now with writers like Clark Ashton Smith, a contemporary of Lovecraft's who was admittedly a much better stylist; Fritz Leiber, who writes about real people with real emotions in his horror stories; Thomas Ligotti, whose sense of alienation and misanthropy in the face of an uncaring cosmos is almost unparalleled; William Hope Hodgson, who journeyed to unfathomed depths of time and space and brought back something too horrible to contemplate a good thirty years before Lovecraft did, I might have knocked the rating down by one star. But really, none of those authors were even remotely in my sights at the time, and reading these stories today, I believe most of them still stand up very well. True, none of Lovecraft's characters feel like real people. But this connects with a theory I have about horror fiction: the "blank slate" approach to character works very well in horror precisely because these are "empty shells" of people, which your imagination can fill at its leisure. When we have pages and pages of background about a person, that person becomes integrated and real to us, in a sense, and although we can feel sadness when such a fictional character experiences loss or pain or death, we never for one moment think of that person as "us", and our minds don't really pull the trick of substituting that made-up individual with our own beings. In stuff like Lovecraft's fiction, or David Lindsay's book A Voyage to Arcturus, the fact that the people written about are ciphers that never have lives outside of the story means that that space can be filled, unconsciously perhaps, with our own experiences, and so the stories become all the more disturbing and get under the skin with surprising ease. Or maybe all that's just me. But at any rate, here we really do have some of Lovecraft's best fiction. not all of it, mind you, but more than enough to get a taste and then some of what the man was all about. Creepy, short pieces with clear Poe influences, like "In the Vault" are here in a small number. Frightening tales of descent, of degeneracy into screaming madness, oh, most certainly. Stories about the unknowable horrors that lurk beneath the sea and wait for the right moment to call the minds of the pitiful human herds to do their bidding! Great cosmic beings, winging their way towards us, on unfathomable missions whose principles alone would transform the strongest men into gibbering wrecks! Ancient, cold, aloof beings who survive time and death to take possession of human psyches! All can be found within the forbidding pages of this tome! I read these for the first time, late in the evening or at night. Mostly, I remember waiting to be picked up from school, in a room full of other ten or eleven-year-olds, completely shut off from everything. I wasn't interested in a damned thing but finishing these stories. IN particular, I remember reading "The Color out of Space" in just such an environment, and finally going home with a sick, queazy feeling, wondering if I would hear a strange dragging noise in the night, and I would tip-toe quiveringly down the stairs only to find my family collapsing around me, turning to piles of grey dust. "The Whisperer in Darkness" read to me like a science fiction story, but one of a kind with which I was completely unfamiliar. Beforehand, my ideas about space were wonderous, excited. Now I thought to myself, "what horrors could really be out there?" And that ending! "The Shadow over Innsmouth" also chilled me to the bone, and yes, I think it's much more effective than the film Dagon, which borrows a lot from this tale. it's also one of the more action-oriented pieces in the anthology, so if you're afraid to tackle Lovecraft because you've heard he's slow and pedantic, perhaps start with this one. I love how the narrator manages to escape from the horrors confronting him, only to find that a worse fate has been waiting for him all along. These are the best sorts of endings in horror, and represent the pinnacle of what the genre is really all about.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lou

    Master of horror writes a story of true forces of evil. The story beats a lot of modern writers in prose, characters and plot. I can see why many screenwriters have taken from pages of Lovecraft's characters. It seems that The Dark Tower series by King has a lot of inspiration from these elements in Dunwich Horror and other stories. A dark malevolent force of evil has taken over Dunwich is there hope? You are taken through the accounts and findings of this evil, a very good tale. "Young Wilbur‘s Master of horror writes a story of true forces of evil. The story beats a lot of modern writers in prose, characters and plot. I can see why many screenwriters have taken from pages of Lovecraft's characters. It seems that The Dark Tower series by King has a lot of inspiration from these elements in Dunwich Horror and other stories. A dark malevolent force of evil has taken over Dunwich is there hope? You are taken through the accounts and findings of this evil, a very good tale. "Young Wilbur‘s precociousness, Old Whateley's black magic, and the shelves of strange books, the sealed second storey of the ancient farmhouse, and the weirdness of the whole region land its hill noises. "

  14. 5 out of 5

    P42

    I'll be coming back to this book.

  15. 5 out of 5

    ᴥ Irena ᴥ

    4.5 This is one of my favourite Lovecraft's stories. It is wonderfully written, the imagery is perfect for what it was set out to do and some of the characters are just horrifying enough to keep you on your toes. Dunwich is an isolated little place in New England. It wasn't much better before the events told here either. Wilbur Whately was born in 1913. His mother Lavinia Whateley, a deformed albino woman, spends her days wondering through the countryside. After his birth, his grandfather starts 4.5 This is one of my favourite Lovecraft's stories. It is wonderfully written, the imagery is perfect for what it was set out to do and some of the characters are just horrifying enough to keep you on your toes. Dunwich is an isolated little place in New England. It wasn't much better before the events told here either. Wilbur Whately was born in 1913. His mother Lavinia Whateley, a deformed albino woman, spends her days wondering through the countryside. After his birth, his grandfather starts buying a lot of cattle and sheep, but their numbers don't seem to increase at all when the nosy and curious neighbours check them. Wilbur is not an ordinary child. He grows too fast, he starts speaking almost right away. And dogs seem to hate him with passion. Every now and then Wilbur and his grandfather, a black magic practitioner, would start working on the house, rebuilding and changing. All the people know is that part of the house is almost completely closed. One thing the Whatelys couldn't get rid of is the all-present stench that enveloped Wilbur. Wilbur's father is interesting. You know from the start that the father isn't human. Later you get another surprise too. Cthulhu is not mentioned, but Yog-Sothoth is and you get a glimpse of a threat the Old Ones present and how far they'd go to return. The whole story is told by a narrator who did not experience the Dunwich horror events himself. The reader somehow ends up being totally immersed in the story, but from above. If I had to choose one book to introduce Lovecraft to someone, this would be it.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

    4.5 stars. Outstanding collection of H.P Lovecraft stories. The Dunwich Horror is an amazing story that reads as well today as when it was first written. Lovecraft was a unique talent and his stories are just a ton of fun.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Maxine Marsh

    The Rats in the Walls has always been my personal favorite.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kenneth McKinley

    In my quest to discover the works of one of the most influential writers in all of horror, I immerse myself into yet another story by H.P. Lovecraft. This time it is The Dunwich Horror and I find, yet again, its hard to go wrong with Lovecraft. In the backwoods town of Dunwich, Mass., Wilbur Whateley is born to his disfigured albino mother Lavinia. The father's identity is unknown but later in the story it is alluded that the father is Yog-Sothoth by Wilbur's half-mad and witchcraft practicing In my quest to discover the works of one of the most influential writers in all of horror, I immerse myself into yet another story by H.P. Lovecraft. This time it is The Dunwich Horror and I find, yet again, its hard to go wrong with Lovecraft. In the backwoods town of Dunwich, Mass., Wilbur Whateley is born to his disfigured albino mother Lavinia. The father's identity is unknown but later in the story it is alluded that the father is Yog-Sothoth by Wilbur's half-mad and witchcraft practicing grandfather, Old Whateley. Wilbur grows at an abnormally fast rate and reaches maturity by age ten and continues to grow. The locals try to avoid Wilbur and his family and animals detest him due to the smell he gives off. Wilbur continues to grow into a freakish size and learns sorcery and black magic from his grandfather. The locals begin getting suspicious as Old Whately always seems to be purchasing cattle, yet his herd never seems to grow and the cattle that are seen in the pasture have open sores on them. Wilbur attempts to secure an unabridged Latin version of the Necronomicon in an effort to summon the "Old Ones" into this world. As the years go by, Wilbur and his grandfather continually remodel their home to larger proportions and strange rumblings are heard inside the house. Soon afterwards, Wilbur's grandfather and mother mysteriously die and the rumblings get worse and more frequent. What could be going on in the Whateley house? Lovecraft's tale continues the revealing of Yog-Sothoth, the Old Ones, and the Necronomicon. It is wonderfully written with lots of suspense and eerieness. Its impossible to miss his influences on so many well-known horror stories and movies of the past and present. I've really enjoyed this journey into discovering Lovecraft. I'm looking forward to the next chapter of our journey together....into the macabre. 5 out of 5 stars You can also follow my reviews at the following links: https://kenmckinley.wordpress.com https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/5... http://www.amazon.com/gp/profile/A2J1... TWITTER - @KenMcKinley5

  19. 4 out of 5

    TheSkepticalReader

    I started out incredibly skeptical and wary of this collection as I was made aware that Lovecraft is racist and that his prejudicial attitude appears in his writing often. I liked the title story and “The Thing on the Doorstep” quite a bit, but as I continued jumping around the collection, I found the collection too repetitive ultimately. He seems to play with the same themes repeatedly and, forget scaring me, the stories eventually stop becoming even mildly entertaining. I think I’ll pass on I started out incredibly skeptical and wary of this collection as I was made aware that Lovecraft is racist and that his prejudicial attitude appears in his writing often. I liked the title story and “The Thing on the Doorstep” quite a bit, but as I continued jumping around the collection, I found the collection too repetitive ultimately. He seems to play with the same themes repeatedly and, forget scaring me, the stories eventually stop becoming even mildly entertaining. I think I’ll pass on more Lovecraft in the future.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tom Mueller

    As Howard wanted, many have tried over the years to expound on his Cthulhu Mythos; few even came close. I believe he named man's strongest emotion as Fear, with the greatest Fear being that of the unknown. Did you ever overcome your own fear enough to actually Look under your bed when you just Knew Some Unknown Thing was there? Nah, neither have I.

  21. 5 out of 5

    GilliansCafe

    Listening as I work on computer projects https://youtu.be/7NydhWxfDeU?list=PLG... I'm becoming addicted to HP Lovecraft stories.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Isaac Thorne

    I listened to the audiobook edition of this and I can finally say that I enjoy Lovecraft stories much more if they're read to me. These stories are classic Lovecraft in every way. He builds worlds with creeping, undulating atmospheres that do not let up. There's a reason so many horror authors of the modern era were influenced by the work of Lovecraft. If you've never read any of his work, this volume is a great place to start.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Steven Walle

    This is a great horror story penned by a master of the jenre. Enjoy and be blessed.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Like a lot of other mopey adolescents, I devoured H.P. Lovecraft when I was in high school; I owned several collections of his short stories and novellas. I remember loving his unwholesome, horrifying vision of Earth's past, present and future. Inspired by an article that recently appeared on a favorite pop culture website, I decided to say hello to Howard P. again. Iä! Iä! Big mistake. I forgot he has just one plot: someone (usually a middle-aged professor at witch-haunted Arkham's Miskatonic Like a lot of other mopey adolescents, I devoured H.P. Lovecraft when I was in high school; I owned several collections of his short stories and novellas. I remember loving his unwholesome, horrifying vision of Earth's past, present and future. Inspired by an article that recently appeared on a favorite pop culture website, I decided to say hello to Howard P. again. Iä! Iä! Big mistake. I forgot he has just one plot: someone (usually a middle-aged professor at witch-haunted Arkham's Miskatonic University) recalls, with the help of supplementary materials (diaries, letters, phonograph recordings, newspaper clippings), an encounter with gibbering beings from outside our solar system/the afterlife/below desert wastes or oceans. This someone is usually on the brink of madness by the end of his tale. The man had an incredible imagination; it's too bad his stories, when read back to back in a collection, are so annoyingly repetitive. Oh well. I'm going to wait a bit before tackling Lovecraft's masterpiece, At the Mountains of Madness. Cthulhu fhtagn!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Julie Yang

    love this book! it genuinely gave me the creeps and was interesting to read. I would highly recommend it. the story sucked me in and I loved the finale ending.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kyle

    Not my exact copy, but here's my ranking of the stories in my copy: 1. Herbert West, Reanimator 2. The Dunwich Horror 3. The Case of Charles Dexter Ward 4. The Lurking Fear 5. Dreamquest of Unknown Kadath. You can read my full review of all of these here! https://kawreviews.blogspot.com/2019/...

  27. 4 out of 5

    trina

    i was far, far too hard on old howard philips that last time around. these stories are, with the exception of one or two of the shorter ones (which were just hilariously corny), marvelously creepy and moody and i totally understand now why he's considered the father of modern horror, or whatever. well, him and poe, anyway. the old-fashioned-ness of his language adds to the atmosphere of utter madness and terror, and i began to appreciate for the first time that the vast reaches of outer space i was far, far too hard on old howard philips that last time around. these stories are, with the exception of one or two of the shorter ones (which were just hilariously corny), marvelously creepy and moody and i totally understand now why he's considered the father of modern horror, or whatever. well, him and poe, anyway. the old-fashioned-ness of his language adds to the atmosphere of utter madness and terror, and i began to appreciate for the first time that the vast reaches of outer space can be horrifying, his characters contemplating so often that we don't know what the hell is floating and growing and plotting out there and all. hehe. i will be reading more from lovecraft in the future, i predict.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Chas

    It's been years since I'd taken a look at Lovecraft, and in that time I'd become a rather large fan of Michael Moorcock -- far from a fan of Lovecraft. I wasn't sure if his (and others) opinion would color my enjoyment of this book, but I have to say, despite the similarity in subject matter these stories all have, some of these are just as thrilling as I remember, and Lovecraft's prose style isn't nearly as turgid as I'd remembered. They're formulaic, and the racism and xenophobia is hard to It's been years since I'd taken a look at Lovecraft, and in that time I'd become a rather large fan of Michael Moorcock -- far from a fan of Lovecraft. I wasn't sure if his (and others) opinion would color my enjoyment of this book, but I have to say, despite the similarity in subject matter these stories all have, some of these are just as thrilling as I remember, and Lovecraft's prose style isn't nearly as turgid as I'd remembered. They're formulaic, and the racism and xenophobia is hard to swallow, but if you're looking for exciting, and gruesome tales of cosmic horror, Lovecraft's still the best, and this is about as good a collection as you can expect to find.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay

    Lovecraft does Cold Comfort Farm, or Stella Gibbons on a very bad acid trip. A family of inbreds in the sticks of New England grow something nasty in the woodshed. Flora Post is replaced by one Professor Arkham fresh from the city, going native and saving the day. The Cowkeepers' Weekly Bulletin and Milk Producers' Guide is replaced by the Mad Arab Abdul Alhazred's Necronomicon. Aimless, Feckless, Graceless and Pointless the cows are savaged by a gargantuan oily beast summoned from another Lovecraft does Cold Comfort Farm, or Stella Gibbons on a very bad acid trip. A family of inbreds in the sticks of New England grow something nasty in the woodshed. Flora Post is replaced by one Professor Arkham fresh from the city, going native and saving the day. The Cowkeepers' Weekly Bulletin and Milk Producers' Guide is replaced by the Mad Arab Abdul Alhazred's Necronomicon. Aimless, Feckless, Graceless and Pointless the cows are savaged by a gargantuan oily beast summoned from another dimension. But in essentials they are the same book.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    This review is going to be an as-I-read review. Because reasons. (view spoiler)[I'm on the 4th paragraph and I just audibly yelled at the book. You cannot spend 3 paragraphs explaining how menacing the countryside is only to then tell me that it is "more than commonly beautiful". Screw you, Lovecraft, I already hate this story. "deeds of almost unnamable violence and perversity" *rolls eyes* "No one, even those who have the facts concerning the recent horror, can say just what is the matter with This review is going to be an as-I-read review. Because reasons. (view spoiler)[I'm on the 4th paragraph and I just audibly yelled at the book. You cannot spend 3 paragraphs explaining how menacing the countryside is only to then tell me that it is "more than commonly beautiful". Screw you, Lovecraft, I already hate this story. "deeds of almost unnamable violence and perversity" *rolls eyes* "No one, even those who have the facts concerning the recent horror, can say just what is the matter with Dunwich; though old legends speak of unhallowed rites and conclaves of the Indians..." Apparently even if you know what's wrong with the town... You don't actually know what's wrong with the town. *rolls eyes again* And... now we start on the part of the story where we get to see how much of a racist jackass Lovecraft is. "she was a lone creature given to wandering amidst thunderstorms in the hills" Because duh... Some random dude owning cows and the cows themselves are apparently important enough to get almost an entire paragraph to themselves. They probably die horrible deaths at some point. And now everyone is totally cool with the baby-freak-o-nature and his mutant powered growth. Of course something weird happens on Halloween, why wouldn't it? Are we not the most clique horror story ever? The mutant baby is so accepted by the townsfolk that when he starts talking at 11 months it is only notable because he doesn't lisp like a normal 3-4 yr old AND he had an accent. I'm sitting here just glaring at this story. And clearly it's a mystery as how the voice works because the vocal chords are referred to as "internal organs that produced the spoken sounds". The hell, Lovecraft? Oh but wait, the townsfolk now hate him because it turns out he's just really ugly. Here we go. Let's find all the ways to creatively not describe something: "could not come from anything sane or of this earth" except that maybe it smelt like racism. Who the hell actually says "three-dimensioned earth"? I didn't know a trip to a library could be described as "grotesque". Does Dr. Armitage sleep in his library?? No, he lives right across the street from it. That's convenient. Ooooh more description avoidance. "what was taking place was not a thing for unfortified eyes to see" Sorry, Lovecraft, nothing you say will convince me that whippoorwills are creepy. I read a review that made note that when anything scary happens that everyone just faints. The fainting has begun. So you want me to believe that this mutant kid, who's been accustomed to carrying a gun around with him for years to ward off dogs, just somehow wasn't able to shoot a dog (that lives in the library it seems) that he knew would be there? This kid is like 9 feet tall and carries a gun and somehow the dog gets the better of him? The dog dented the revolver before any shot could be fired? Really? "It would be trite and not wholly accurate to say that no human pen could describe it, but one may properly say that it could not be vividly visualized by anyone whose ideas of aspect and contour are too closely bound up with the common life-forms of this planet and of the three known dimensions. Screw you too, Lovecraft. "But the torso and lower parts of the body were teratologically fabulous, so that only generous clothing could ever have enabled it to walk on earth unchallenged or uneradicated." That helps me so much, thank you. Come on, you actually started to describe the kid, which is now being referred to as an it, and then you go and write this, "Their arrangement was odd, and seemed to follow the symmetries of some cosmic geometry unknown to earth or the solar system." And now I have to reread this lovely confusing description because I can't actually figure out what the hell you just described. Maybe you should have just stuck with "too horrible to look upon". I wonder if anyone has drawn this kid/thing... Yup, now I'm left wondering how in the hell you can hide all of that mess under regular clothing. How would that be even remotely comfortable? I also am super curious as to what got his/its mom prego, and how, but that's a whole different kind of horror story. "Meanwhile frightful changes were taking place on the floor. One need not describe the kind and rate of shrinkage and disintegration that occurred before the eyes of Dr. Armitage... Um, what? That's nice, the kid just basically melted. Yum. I will never look at yogurt or ice cream the same. "He had taken somewhat after his unknown father." Because that's obvious to random bystanders. Maybe Lovecraft thinks that all "half-breeds" don't have skeletons and melt when they die. I bet he does. He's just that much of a jerk. So..... I am now on Part VII and I've just found out that what I've been reading is the prologue of the actual Dunwich horror. Strange, I thought I was reading the story but seems it was all an illusion. Onward, to the actual story I was trying to read, or something! The cops in this story are woefully incompetent. I blame them for whatever happens next. They all know something nasty is in that house, but no, lets not investigate, it would be too horrible I'm sure. There would be much fainting. So there are libraries with all of these evil and forbidden texts yet no one can seem to translate this mutant kid's diary. I feel like they didn't try very hard, if you've got these nasty pieces of work there's going to be some sections that relate to the language the kid used. No one can be bothered to find a code-breaker either. I feel like this would be important. People saw the kid with nasties coming out of his body and then melt why would you not try harder to figure out what he was up to????? OH. I see what you did there. This is just another device to keep from having to think too hard and write descriptions. Ass. And suddenly this random inbred "decayed" person is an expert at reading tracks in the mud. Of course the only person who could have come up with any coherent thought or plan about "the horror" wasn't present. OF COURSE. Why did you even tell me that, Lovecraft? Wait wait wait. You're telling me that even though it's 3am and everyone is awake because of the birds yelling that no one could think of calling their neighbors after the phone call for help went out? That everyone waited until morning to MAKE PHONECALLS? I understand not going outside, because death, but a phone call isn't that complicated. Can we just say rocks fall and everyone dies? Cuz that's what I'm getting from this. Lovecraft, you really need to be punched in the face. Oh and now we are back to discussing the mutant kid's books and diary. I think Lovecraft had an afterthought and realized that cryptography is a thing. And all we get is a tiny sample of what was written in the diary. We don't even get a real summary. Of course not, why would I even be surprised anymore? We've got an army of three! I think they are all librarians. This should go well. We have an army of three scholars... And they think they will do better than an army of 5 police officers? "Armitage, having read the hideous diary, knew painfully well what kind of a manifestation to expect; but he did not add to the fright of the Dunwich people by giving any hints or clues." Of course not. Why ruin the suspense of having to actually write something. Wait... So this thing is invisible? I'm going to have to physically buy this book later just so I can burn it. Wow. Just wow. Lovecraft just loves avoiding having to write any sort of description. Is this suppose to make it scarier? Am I suppose to be impressed that he thought up a stinky invisible monster (that apparently leaves sludge in its wake but only sometimes, how does it even do that?)? Seriously? Lazy, lazy writing. I don't even. So let's see if I have this correct. Armitage knows that it's invisible but fails to tell people because he thinks it's in their best interest? You know what would have been their best interest? Not being murdered by an invisible monster, that's what. This thing obviously gives plenty of warning as it's coming by its stench, makes weird noises, and the fact that is crushes shit when it moves around but because no one knows that it is an invisible slaughter machine they don't know to run for their lives if they see or smell these things. THIS HAPPENED DURING THE DAY! So instead they run into their house and phone people being all like, my house is being crushed with me in it and I'm too stupid to run out the back door, or window, or anything. I'm envisioning the princess mononoke demon pig for this thing. Except with more feet apparently, and more jelly like, bigger, and with a face scarier than a boars face covered with demon worms. Anyway, yah, that's what I'm going with. Or maybe like a gibbering mouther but slightly wormier? I still like my demon pig image. Works for me. And let's get some fainting done before something else happens. I wonder if people went out and slaughtered whippoorwills after reading this book? So. Now I'm in a section where the army of three ran off to mess with inviso-monster and we get to stay behind and "watch" with the townsfolk. Of course we do. God forbid we get to watch all close up and personal with the army of three. That would be too much work for Lovecraft to write. "The weird silhouette on that remote peak must have been a spectacle of infinite grotesqueness and impressiveness, but no observer was in a mood for aesthetic appreciation." Of course not. "The change in the quality of the daylight increased" Can someone help me out with this? One of his other "descriptions" in another story was about an angle that was acute but behaved as if it were obtuse. I still don't know what that even means. "No one, however, had been using the telescope at that instant." Why do I even bother. "some imponderable menace" No pondering or thinking allowed. That would be too much work. "It is almost erroneous to call them sounds at all, since so much of their ghastly, infra-bass timbre spoke to dim seats of consciousness and terror far subtler than the ear; yet one must do so, since their form was indisputably though vaguely that of half-articulate words." Drama Queen. I feel like Lovecraft expects readers to gasp and wring their hands at this point. "And because imagination might suggest a conjectural source in the world of non-visible beings" I'm pretty sure I wrote like this when I was a teenager and thought I was writing as if I were some great philosopher or as if my words had some sort of deep meaning because of the weird words and sentence structure. "From what black wells of Acherontic fear or feeling, from what unplumbed gulfs of extra-cosmic consciousness or obscure, long-latent heredity, were those half-articulate thunder-croakings drawn?" Seriously... Now it just reads like melodrama is dripping all over the place. "A single lightning-bolt shot from the purple zenith to the altar-stone, and a great tidal wave of viewless force and indescribable stench swept down from the hill to all the countryside. " Naturally. He just killed all of the whippoorwills. "They were grave and quiet, and seemed shaken by memories and reflections even more terrible than those which had reduced the group of natives to a state of cowed quivering. In reply to a jumble of questions they only shook their heads..." mhm So you expect me to believe that this huge invisible monster isn't able to gain on the army of three old librarian dudes as they scramble for their lives but that people somehow can't get away when it's coming for them at their houses? I kinda think someone could just out-walk this thing. Oh holy crap he described the inviso-monster's face. I'm SHOCKED! It was his twin brother. NOOO! GASP! FAINT! WTF. So this is suppose to be some sort of plot twist? Like omg there was a second brother all along? The mutant kid's twin bother (can you REALLY call them twins, honestly?) was just as f'ed up and essentially was just uglier than him, you know, when he's not invisible. And, really it doesn't actually matter at all that "it was his twin brother". For all it matters a random animal could have given birth to the "child", everything would have happened the same. The poor "twin" brother though was basically a prisoner forever trapped in a crappy old house. He only busted out and murdered animals and people because no one was left to feed him cows. Apparently he was capable of speech but never bothered to use his words until it was convenient for Lovecraft to try to make it creepier. What was the point of keeping him locked up when no one could see him anyway? What's the point of hiding something away when it is literally hidden in plain sight? Also, if you gave birth to one mutant baby and then something invisible where "Only the least fraction was really matter in any sense we know" HOW WOULD YOU EVEN KNOW? I just realized that Wilbur probably fed his mother to his brother. So the "father" was YOG-SOTHOTH. I really hope that when the poor mother got with child that he/it was invisible at the time, cuz that's just nasty. So, if old Yog was the father and the invisible child mostly took after him I feel like the nasty Yog-parts of Wilbur should have been invisible as well. Keep things consistent, you know? I'm tempted to give this a third star solely based on how much I enjoyed writing this play-by-play review. That star is invisible (and is also Wilbur's brother). Plot twist! (hide spoiler)]

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.