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El horror de Dunwich

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Deadly forces are about to be awakened! In the degenerate, unpopular backwater of Dunwich, Wilbur Whately, a most unusual child, is born. Of unnatural parentage, he grows at an uncanny pace to an unsettling height, but the boy’s arrival simply precedes that of a true horror — One of the Old Ones, that forces the people of the town to hole up by night, fearing for their Deadly forces are about to be awakened! In the degenerate, unpopular backwater of Dunwich, Wilbur Whately, a most unusual child, is born. Of unnatural parentage, he grows at an uncanny pace to an unsettling height, but the boy’s arrival simply precedes that of a true horror — One of the Old Ones, that forces the people of the town to hole up by night, fearing for their lives, only able to trace the wreckage wrought by the gigantic, unseen monster by the bright light of day. In his classic style, H. P. Lovecraft weaves unearthly fantasies of creatures beyond conception — existing between the dimensions that we know.


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Deadly forces are about to be awakened! In the degenerate, unpopular backwater of Dunwich, Wilbur Whately, a most unusual child, is born. Of unnatural parentage, he grows at an uncanny pace to an unsettling height, but the boy’s arrival simply precedes that of a true horror — One of the Old Ones, that forces the people of the town to hole up by night, fearing for their Deadly forces are about to be awakened! In the degenerate, unpopular backwater of Dunwich, Wilbur Whately, a most unusual child, is born. Of unnatural parentage, he grows at an uncanny pace to an unsettling height, but the boy’s arrival simply precedes that of a true horror — One of the Old Ones, that forces the people of the town to hole up by night, fearing for their lives, only able to trace the wreckage wrought by the gigantic, unseen monster by the bright light of day. In his classic style, H. P. Lovecraft weaves unearthly fantasies of creatures beyond conception — existing between the dimensions that we know.

30 review for El horror de Dunwich

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alejandro

    Lovecraft at his prime! SCARY AND SOLID AS HECK One of the best tales by H.P. Lovecraft... ...and part of the Cthulhu Mythos... ...AND... ...my personal favorite story written by H.P. Lovecraft! This story is set on the fictional town of Dunwich, Mass., near of the also fictional town of the infamous Arkham, Mass.. This is the sad tale of Wilbur Whateley that since his birth was clear that something was too strange about him, growing up in a scary speed, reaching adulthood in just 10 years, and Lovecraft at his prime! SCARY AND SOLID AS HECK One of the best tales by H.P. Lovecraft... ...and part of the Cthulhu Mythos... ...AND... ...my personal favorite story written by H.P. Lovecraft! This story is set on the fictional town of Dunwich, Mass., near of the also fictional town of the infamous Arkham, Mass.. This is the sad tale of Wilbur Whateley that since his birth was clear that something was too strange about him, growing up in a scary speed, reaching adulthood in just 10 years, and discharging an awful smell around him. Wilbur’s grandfather is entitled to the education of him, both regular learning about the world as well obscure arcanic one. The Whateley Farm encloses a dark secret... ...that nobody must know about... ...if Dunwich may have any chance to keep existing.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Orient

    A Lovecrafty BR with my great GR friend Craig. Viva la Cthulhu and his kin What a nice read with monsters! :) I liked this story a lot, the pace was quicker, the writing more engaging, the info about the main plotline - gripping . Dark family secrets, creepy cult, monsters, MONSTERS, suspense, ancient mystery, juicy fighting, other universes. Omg, the only flaw is that this story is too short! Btw, there are some movies! :) http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0065669/ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1226752/ A Lovecrafty BR with my great GR friend Craig. Viva la Cthulhu and his kin 💜💜💜💜 What a nice read with monsters! :) I liked this story a lot, the pace was quicker, the writing more engaging, the info about the main plotline - gripping . Dark family secrets, creepy cult, monsters, MONSTERS, suspense, ancient mystery, juicy fighting, other universes. Omg, the only flaw is that this story is too short! Btw, there are some movies! :) http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0065669/ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1226752/ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1733465/

  3. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    If you like the cosmic horror of Lovecraft (and who doesn't) and if you want to find out more about the Necronomicon, this is the right novella for you. Strange things are going on in the small village of Dunwich but what is the plan of the Whatleys (a kind of inbred hick family)? Whose son is Wilbur Whatley (an absolutely uncanny character) and what passages is he trying to find in the Necronomicon? Dr Armitage and a few brave men from Arkham desperately want to prevent an evil entity to come If you like the cosmic horror of Lovecraft (and who doesn't) and if you want to find out more about the Necronomicon, this is the right novella for you. Strange things are going on in the small village of Dunwich but what is the plan of the Whatleys (a kind of inbred hick family)? Whose son is Wilbur Whatley (an absolutely uncanny character) and what passages is he trying to find in the Necronomicon? Dr Armitage and a few brave men from Arkham desperately want to prevent an evil entity to come into our world. Yog-Sothoth is the gate keeper and possibility to get the old ones back on earth... Will Armitage and his team succeed? This creepy story will scare you senseless. Great story, great plotting, cosmic evil Gods and a fantastic showdown. Absolutely recommended. One of Lovecraft's alltime classics!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Leonard Gaya

    The Dunwich Horror, written for Weird Tales around 1929, after The Colour Out of Space and before The Whisperer in Darkness, is probably one of the most significant pieces of the Cthulhu mythos. Once again, the protagonists are investigating a strange case in a derelict New England town (you probably won’t want to visit the Miskatonic Valley after reading Lovecraft, but you won’t find it on any map of this world either!). Once more, individuals with hideous deformities will lead them to a The Dunwich Horror, written for Weird Tales around 1929, after The Colour Out of Space and before The Whisperer in Darkness, is probably one of the most significant pieces of the Cthulhu mythos. Once again, the protagonists are investigating a strange case in a derelict New England town (you probably won’t want to visit the Miskatonic Valley after reading Lovecraft, but you won’t find it on any map of this world either!). Once more, individuals with hideous deformities will lead them to a nightmarish realisation and open broad vistas onto a malevolent cosmos. This story is an evil elaboration on the Christian doctrines of the Incarnation and Immaculate Conception: a woman afflicted with albinism (immaculate? sinless?) conceives a son who displays strange characteristics, becomes an adult prematurely (cf. Jesus’s Disputation episode) and has a keen interest in esoteric scriptures (The Torah vs The Necronomicon). In the end, the son of Yahveh cries out: “Eli Eli Lama Sabachthani?”, while the son of Yog-Sothoth yells: “HELP! HELP!…ff—ff—ff—FATHER! FATHER!” The style of this story is also much more vivid than in most other HLP novelettes: it includes some pieces of dialogue, direct speech — often tainted with a strong accent, which adds a hint of comical effect; a device that Lovecraft would further develop in The Shadow Over Innsmouth — and even a significant excerpt of the Necronomicon! It is said that HPL drew his inspiration from some of Arthur Machen’s tales. In any case, his novella has been a significant source for Ira Levin’s Rosemary's Baby. The guttural language of the Klingons (Star Trek) is a variation of the hideous tongue of the Outer Gods.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mir

    For all the people who complain about Lovecraft's tendency to present horrors that are ineffable and indescribable, perhaps you will like better this horror that is writhy-tentacly and mutilates cattle and smashes down houses and crushes people, and also knocks up hillbilly ladies with its mutant children to bring about the destruction of humankind. (view spoiler)[But don't worry, old white men will save us with Latin. (hide spoiler)]

  6. 4 out of 5

    Bill Kerwin

    I love first time reads, but I love re-reads even more, for with each re-reading, I learn more about the work, and more about myself too. The first time I read "The Dunwich Horror," I was twelve. “Dunwich ” scared the hell out of me, and I loved it,but it was also satisfying in other ways, ways that reminded me of the books I already knew. For example, it started out with the birth of a boy whose father’s origin was a mystery, and the first part of the story followed this boy (Wilbur Whateley) as I love first time reads, but I love re-reads even more, for with each re-reading, I learn more about the work, and more about myself too. The first time I read "The Dunwich Horror," I was twelve. “Dunwich ” scared the hell out of me, and I loved it,but it was also satisfying in other ways, ways that reminded me of the books I already knew. For example, it started out with the birth of a boy whose father’s origin was a mystery, and the first part of the story followed this boy (Wilbur Whateley) as he attempted--through occult books and spells--to learn more about his origins and destiny (boy’s adventures—minus the occult part--often begin in this way), and though the story's second part took a dark turn, it ended with an exciting chase across open country, and--even better--the triumph of good over evil! (I found this satisfying, for—in spite of my new love for horror—I still liked it better when the good guys won.) A generation passed, and I read “Dunwich” again, this time finding it one of the least satisfying of Lovecraft’s tales. The revelation of what Wilbur looked like under his clothes was just as terrifying as ever, but what happened afterward seemed like one long dreary anti-climax. The chase was corny, like something out of a boy’s novel, uncalled for in classic horror fiction. Another generation passed, and a few days ago I read “The Dunwich Horror” again, and discovering it to be as delightful as when I first encountered it. I have been thinking lately about what makes Lovecraft such a great horror writer. There was the mythos of course, and his remarkable sense of place, but there was something else, an aspect I had only recently begun to appreciate: the great number of narrative genres and themes he manipulated in order to vary his one constant, terrible concern. “Rats in the Walls” (old fashioned gothic), “The Call of Cthulhu” (one mystery revealed through multiple viewpoints), “The Shadow Over Innsmouth” (a stranger explores a strange town), “The Outsider” (Poe-style soliloquy), “The Quest of Iranon” (Dunsanian fantasy), “The Case of Charles Dexter Ward” (amateur detective), “The Color out of Space” (interstellar phenomena) “The Whisperer in Darkness” (interstellar travel), “At the Mountains of Madness” (account of a scientific expedition), and “The Shadow Out of Time” (psychic time-travel). That is a list—by no means an exhaustive one—to indicate his astonishing variety. This time, more than fifty years after my first reading of “The Dunwich Horror,” I marveled at the skill with which Lovecraft manipulated the tired tropes of the boy’s adventure tale, making the fatherless boy Wilbur himself the first sign of horror, and using the last exciting chase to eradicate the even greater horror the boy wished to manifest. “The Dunwich Horror” isn’t—as I formerly believed--a good horror story marred with a corny ending, No, it is somthing stranger: a boy’s adventure gone mad, a tale that takes the fantasy of marvelous parentage, turns it upside down, and crushes it before your eyes. And then still sends you home with a happy ending.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Bentley ★ Bookbastion.net

    I've been making an effort this year to broaden my horizons and read outside of my comfort zone. Part of that is to better acquaint myself with authors and works considered classic today. HP Lovecraft's collected works have always been high on my list of things to read so I threw myself into this one and ended up enjoying it so much I read the entire thing in the span of an evening. As expected, the prose is definitely dense and might be considered a chore for some readers to try and wade I've been making an effort this year to broaden my horizons and read outside of my comfort zone. Part of that is to better acquaint myself with authors and works considered classic today. HP Lovecraft's collected works have always been high on my list of things to read so I threw myself into this one and ended up enjoying it so much I read the entire thing in the span of an evening. As expected, the prose is definitely dense and might be considered a chore for some readers to try and wade through. One thing I really appreciated about this story was the lengths that Lovecraft went to in order to establish Dunwich as a setting. The story is a slow burn one, in which the darkened forests, hills and valleys of Dunwich become as much a character as any of the many various townspeople and their families that are introduced. It takes a bit of investment, getting used to the characters and the landscape of Dunwich before the true meat of the scares start, but it's very much worth it. By establishing the elements of the world so clearly at the start of the story, Lovecraft grounds this particular tale within a localized environment that feels aged and real. It provides an important balance to the latter half of the story, as the usual cosmic horror elements are introduced and evil makes itself apparent. Familiarizing myself with Lovecraft is sort of great fun, because in a lot of ways I can pick out the influence his writing has had on some of my favorite horror media today. Cosmic horror as a genre was born and thrived under Lovecraft's pen. He masterfully makes the great evils that befall his characters both otherworldly, and yet they feel terrifyingly real or possible, as though his very words tap into that same wellspring of darkness that he writes about. There are certain aspects of this story that aren't socially acceptable today that rubbed me the wrong way, but I tend to take anything written outside our current political and social climates with a grain of salt. If you can look past those aspects, and don't mind slow-burn horror that intensifies as it goes along, this is a story that is sure to please. 5 out of 5 stars

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jojo

    I have only been introduced to Lovecraft's work, during the past couple of months or so. I didn't really think that he would be my cup of tea quite honestly. I was specifically recommended to read this one, and it didn't disappoint, so I will spend forever thanking him. After this being the third story of Lovecraft's that I've read, I can say with confidence that he was insane in his genius or, perhaps genius in his insanity. The writing style again is truly dark and romantic and straight off I have only been introduced to Lovecraft's work, during the past couple of months or so. I didn't really think that he would be my cup of tea quite honestly. I was specifically recommended to read this one, and it didn't disappoint, so I will spend forever thanking him. After this being the third story of Lovecraft's that I've read, I can say with confidence that he was insane in his genius or, perhaps genius in his insanity. The writing style again is truly dark and romantic and straight off the eerie scene is set, and you just get the feeling you are in a deeply unsettling atmosphere. This story sent shivers down my spine! The descriptions of the utter horror are somewhat vivid, but this only encourages the reader to carry on to see the horror unfold before their eyes. I look forward to reading more Lovecraft in the near future.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Michael Sorbello

    One of the absolute best Lovecraft stories right next to At the Mountains of Madness and The Shadow Over Innsmouth. The horror of the monster is especially strong in this one since it takes place in a murky countryside where no one has access to any kind of education, technology or military backup in case of a massive threat. The lack of understanding and the lack of what the people there have access to as a means to fight back intensify the feelings of mystery, fear and hopelessness in the face One of the absolute best Lovecraft stories right next to At the Mountains of Madness and The Shadow Over Innsmouth. The horror of the monster is especially strong in this one since it takes place in a murky countryside where no one has access to any kind of education, technology or military backup in case of a massive threat. The lack of understanding and the lack of what the people there have access to as a means to fight back intensify the feelings of mystery, fear and hopelessness in the face of a godlike entity that could be capable of anything. The final chapter where the group of backwater townsfolk confront the ancient abomination is especially unnerving. The description of the many eyes perpetually opening and closing, the stretched out faces and the slimy tentacles of the amorphous entity make your stomach turn. The alien atmosphere is otherworldly and the tension is thick enough to cut with a knife. Excellent for a good scare.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Book Wyrm

    One of Lovecraft's greatest. A slow, insidious horror story covering the life of a demonic and hyper intelligent child. This is one of the mythos tales done very right, with great atmosphere and the unnerving feeling that something is simply 'wrong'. You're not quite sure what, you're not truly sure why, there's just this uncomfortable, slowly creeping sensation that something larger, more threatening and important than a supernaturally fast growing, psychotic child is at play. The minimal but One of Lovecraft's greatest. A slow, insidious horror story covering the life of a demonic and hyper intelligent child. This is one of the mythos tales done very right, with great atmosphere and the unnerving feeling that something is simply 'wrong'. You're not quite sure what, you're not truly sure why, there's just this uncomfortable, slowly creeping sensation that something larger, more threatening and important than a supernaturally fast growing, psychotic child is at play. The minimal but vivid use of body horror is perfect and the end reveal is genuinely unsettling. Gold star, Lovecraft, even if you are a distinctly classist bastard here.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Shawn Mooney (Shawn The Book Maniac)

    The only thing I was afraid of was that the shitty-shitty-SHITTY prose might make me vomit.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Quirkyreader

    This story was a re-read. Yes, it's still that good.

  13. 5 out of 5

    David Sven

    I find a common mistake (as far as I'm concerned) with a lot of horror is the tendency to reveal the "monster" too early. As Professor Dumbledore tells Harry Potter "Its not the dark we fear but the unknown" (or words to that effect). Once the monster or creature is unveiled it loses its mystery and the suspense dies off. H.P. Lovecraft, on the other hand, knows how to play on our fear of the unknown to create a sense of foreboding in his well known classic "The Dunwich Horror." I like I find a common mistake (as far as I'm concerned) with a lot of horror is the tendency to reveal the "monster" too early. As Professor Dumbledore tells Harry Potter "Its not the dark we fear but the unknown" (or words to that effect). Once the monster or creature is unveiled it loses its mystery and the suspense dies off. H.P. Lovecraft, on the other hand, knows how to play on our fear of the unknown to create a sense of foreboding in his well known classic "The Dunwich Horror." I like Lovecraft's use of imagery and vivid description of background and setting to create a feeling of unease, that builds in suspense to a crescendo at the end when the "horror" is unveiled. As soon as we enter the small country town of Dunwich we immediately know that there is something not quite right about the place. That something evil lives here that is old and dark, rooted in black magic that twists both the land and people. Old Whateley's daughter has given birth to something not quite human. Something that makes strange noises in the night and causes nature itself to behave most unnaturally. A gate has been opened, and something let through. Something that grows quickly and has an appetite and you can be sure as they themselves are that the people of Dunwich are on the menu. 3 stars from me. I loved the use of language and the method of building suspense, but I didn't care much for the story being told entirely from the narrators(non character) POV. It felt almost like reading a news story in a magazine or documentary. It works, I suppose, in a short story but its not my cup of tea. Nonetheless it was enjoyable as a diversion from what I normally read.

  14. 4 out of 5

    J L Shioshita

    One of Lovecraft's more famous stories and for good reason. Also a key tale in the Mythos so required reading for anyone trying to get into all that glorious Yog Sothothery.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Дарья

    "The thing has gone for ever," Armitage said. "It has been split up into what it was originally made of, and can never exist again."

  16. 4 out of 5

    Shawn Birss

    This is my second book of Lovecraft, and already I fear I may be tiring of him. I will give him another chance, however, I did find this piece to be overwritten at times, and I did not discern many new ideas in it that were not explored in The Call of Cthulhu. That said, of the two I found this one easier to read and understand. On the other hand, I found the tone and tension of Cthulhu to be more consistent. In that book, I felt truly carried into the dread and awe of the characters. In this, I This is my second book of Lovecraft, and already I fear I may be tiring of him. I will give him another chance, however, I did find this piece to be overwritten at times, and I did not discern many new ideas in it that were not explored in The Call of Cthulhu. That said, of the two I found this one easier to read and understand. On the other hand, I found the tone and tension of Cthulhu to be more consistent. In that book, I felt truly carried into the dread and awe of the characters. In this, I felt as though I was reading a book of monsters that happened to exist within the same mythology. I find that nearly anything I come across that can be described as "Lovecraftian" I absolutely love, save Lovecraft himself. I recognize that even the overwritten style is part of what makes Lovecraft Lovecraft, what creates the atmosphere of epic wonder in which his stories live. I just didn't feel as though this one hit the notes with me that the author intended. I'll give the author another chance with one of his books with a less common setting. This one is by no means terrible. I just wouldn't recommend it to new readers of Lovecraft.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Oliviu Craznic

    Like most of Lovecraft`s Chtulhu tales, this novella starts quite promising and fails in each and every respect, but style. Lovecraft was an extraordinary master of traditional Gothic, but as soon he abandons the occult for the cosmic terror, the demons and the devils we know for the ... tentacles (!!), the mysterious pits of the deadworld for interdimensional and alien entities, he turns out no scarier than the octopus some of us (not me, though) buy from the supermarket and eat. If you love Like most of Lovecraft`s Chtulhu tales, this novella starts quite promising and fails in each and every respect, but style. Lovecraft was an extraordinary master of traditional Gothic, but as soon he abandons the occult for the cosmic terror, the demons and the devils we know for the ... tentacles (!!), the mysterious pits of the deadworld for interdimensional and alien entities, he turns out no scarier than the octopus some of us (not me, though) buy from the supermarket and eat. If you love Lovecraft, better skip this one.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Alex Bright

    I enjoyed this more than I did The Rats in the Walls. This is a classic example of an Eldritch Horror, with its lush descriptions of both the beautiful and the profane. Its narrative is also captivating, fast moving, and delightfully twisted. The one weakness is in the character development, but that's expected. One does not read H.P. Lovecraft for his human characters -- they are merely set-pieces in a larger, cosmic horror.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mike MacDee

    Easily one of Lovecraft's best. Many of his works involve a lot of buildup for very little payoff, but this one constantly raises the stakes and the weirdness, lacing it all with a thick atmosphere that really makes the degenerate backwater of Dunwich come alive. The reader gets a better sense of involvement than in Call of Cthulhu: both are written in an investigative journalism style (forgiving the dense gothic prose HP loved so well), but whereas Cthulhu leaves the reader feeling far removed Easily one of Lovecraft's best. Many of his works involve a lot of buildup for very little payoff, but this one constantly raises the stakes and the weirdness, lacing it all with a thick atmosphere that really makes the degenerate backwater of Dunwich come alive. The reader gets a better sense of involvement than in Call of Cthulhu: both are written in an investigative journalism style (forgiving the dense gothic prose HP loved so well), but whereas Cthulhu leaves the reader feeling far removed from the events described, Dunwich somehow manages to feel more like an event in progress, and feels more intense as a result. The actual horror doesn't kick off until the second half, and manages to predict classic creature features involving giant monsters running amok in human civilization. Many of HP's "big reveals" are telegraphed pages in advance like always, but the overall experience is a great one and leaves you with a broad collection of unsettling images and ideas. Great spooky fun, and definitely worth reading more than once.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Katy

    Part of The Complete Works of H.P. Lovecraft, which can be found free at the CthulhuChick website for your e-reader. Synopsis: In the degenerate, unliked backwater of Dunwich, Wilbur Whately, a most unusual child, is born. Of unnatural parentage, he grows at an uncanny pace to an unsettling height, but the boy's arrival simply precedes that of a true horror: one of the Old Ones, that forces the people of the town to hole up by night. My Thoughts: Another masterpiece of creeping horror by Part of The Complete Works of H.P. Lovecraft, which can be found free at the CthulhuChick website for your e-reader. Synopsis: In the degenerate, unliked backwater of Dunwich, Wilbur Whately, a most unusual child, is born. Of unnatural parentage, he grows at an uncanny pace to an unsettling height, but the boy's arrival simply precedes that of a true horror: one of the Old Ones, that forces the people of the town to hole up by night. My Thoughts: Another masterpiece of creeping horror by Lovecraft, this relates to his Elder Gods group of stories and builds on earlier stories. While Cthulhu is not specifically mentioned, it is understood to be in the background. This was one I couldn't put down until I finished.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Niall

    goddamn hicks nearly ended humanity! when will they learn, they should stick to playing banjo instead of trying to summon eldritch horrors from beyond reality

  22. 4 out of 5

    Evan Leach

    The Dunwich Horror is one of H.P. Lovecraft’s more famous stories and a key piece of the Cthulhu Mythos. A very weird little boy, one Wilbur Whateley, is born in an isolated, creepy little town in New England. Ol’ Wilbur’s parentage is something of a mystery, and even in a strange town like Dunwich he stands out from the crowd. I won’t attempt to summarize the plot any further, as this is a short story that moves pretty fast. Suffice to say the usual litany of “unspeakable horrors” are involved, The Dunwich Horror is one of H.P. Lovecraft’s more famous stories and a key piece of the Cthulhu Mythos. A very weird little boy, one Wilbur Whateley, is born in an isolated, creepy little town in New England. Ol’ Wilbur’s parentage is something of a mystery, and even in a strange town like Dunwich he stands out from the crowd. I won’t attempt to summarize the plot any further, as this is a short story that moves pretty fast. Suffice to say the usual litany of “unspeakable horrors” are involved, including the Necronomicon and terrifying cosmic entities. This story (along with The Call of Cthulhu and At the Mountains of Madness) is considered to be one of Lovecraft’s strongest works. I didn’t think it was as gripping as Call of Cthulhu, but it was still an entertaining read. The standard caveat applies with a Lovecraft story – his idiosyncratic style is part of his charm for some readers, while others will find it off-putting. Lovecraft really struggled with writing dialogue, and some of the exchanges in this book are nearly as scary as the actual Dunwich Horror: ”Then fur ahead where Bishop’s Brook goes under the rud he heerd a awful creakin’ an’ strainin’ on the bridge, an’ says he could tell the saound o’ wood a-startin’ to crack an’ split. An’ all the whiles he never see a thing, only them trees an’ bushes a bendin’. An’ when the swishin’ saound got very fur off…” You get the idea. But the dialogue aside, I like the Lovecraft style, and if you do too I would recommend this story. This is definitely one of H.P.’s stronger efforts, if not among the very best he has to offer. 4 stars.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    I’m becoming a fan of Lovecraft. I didn’t really know what the party line was, I just knew that the townsfolk used it to tell each other about the monster. My 86 old year dad explained it to me. I said, like a group text, and he said, what’s that. Awesome!!! Anyway, I never have a clue about the endings with Lovecraft. And I wasn’t disappointed this time either.

  24. 5 out of 5

    WenLing

    Halfway through this book, it occurred to me that if there is one author whose work is unfilmable, Lovecraft is the one. The horror in his stories does not rely on visual, but rather it invokes your imagination through nuances and suggestions. I'll take my hat off to the director who will dare to attempt the impossible.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    I listened to the audio version, but can't find it here. Great listen for a 2-hour evening walk. It was creepy and descriptive.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jorge Rosas

    I couldn’t stop reading it! It was a very good story with a lot of suspense and psychological horror.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Deborah

    First #serialreader read. An ok story, also first Lovecraft, thought it was repetitive and overwritten in places and would have been better had he left out the awful dialogue. Still a fun short read

  28. 5 out of 5

    Nadyne

    First sentence: "Gorgons and Hydras, and Chimaeras - dire stories of Celaeno and the Harpies - may reproduce themselves in the brain of superstition - but they were there before." Last sentence: "It was his twin brother, but it looked more like the father than he did." Horror is a genre that I usually avoid, because I know I almost never find a horror book creepy or scary; in stead, most of the time I find the so-called scary things rather ridiculous. But sometimes one has to step out of one's First sentence: "Gorgons and Hydras, and Chimaeras - dire stories of Celaeno and the Harpies - may reproduce themselves in the brain of superstition - but they were there before." Last sentence: "It was his twin brother, but it looked more like the father than he did." Horror is a genre that I usually avoid, because I know I almost never find a horror book creepy or scary; in stead, most of the time I find the so-called scary things rather ridiculous. But sometimes one has to step out of one's comfort zone and try something else. So that's why, for the last two days of 2011, I decided to try some stories by H.P. Lovecraft, as he is seen now as one of the most influential horror writers of the 20th century. The first story I read, The Dunwich Horror, confirmed my opinion that horror just isn't for me... The creature that brought chaos, destruction and death to the little village of Dunwich, just seemed to unreal for me to provoke any effect. Summary Taken from Wikipedia: Wilbur Whateley is the son of a deformed albino mother and an unknown father (alluded to in passing by the mad Old Whateley as "Yog-Sothoth"), and strange events surround his birth and precocious development. Wilbur matures at an abnormal rate, reaching manhood within a decade. All the while, his sorcerer grandfather indoctrinates him into certain dark rituals and the study of witchcraft. The plot revolves around the desire of Wilbur to acquire an unabridged Latin version of the Necronomicon — his imperfect English copy is ill-suited for his dark purpose — so that he may open the way for the return of the mysterious "Old Ones", whose forerunner is the Outer God Yog-Sothoth. Thus, Wilbur and his grandfather have sequestered an unseen presence at their farmhouse; this being is connected somehow to Yog-Sothoth. Year by year, this unseen entity grows to monstrous proportions, requiring Wilbur and his patriarch to make frequent modifications to their residence. People begin to notice a trend of cattle mysteriously disappearing. Eventually, Wilbur's mother also disappears. By the time Wilbur's grandfather dies, the colossal entity occupies the whole interior of the farmhouse. Wilbur ventures to Miskatonic University in Arkham to procure a copy of the dreaded Necronomicon – Miskatonic's library is one of only a handful in the world to stock an original print of the frightful tome. The Necronomicon has certain spells that Wilbur can use to summon the Old Ones for dark purposes unfathomable to men. When the librarian, Dr. Henry Armitage, refuses to release the university's copy to him, Wilbur breaks into the library at night to steal the loathsome book. A guard dog attacks Wilbur with unusual ferocity, killing him. When Dr. Armitage and two other professors arrive on the scene and see Wilbur Whateley's partly non-human corpse, before it melts completely to leave no evidence, they realize that the youth was not wholly of this earth. The story culminates with the actual Dunwich horror: With Wilbur Whateley now dead, no one can attend to the mysterious presence growing in the Whateley farmhouse. Early one morning, the Whateley farmhouse explodes as the thing, an invisible monster, rampages across Dunwich, cutting a path through fields, trees, and ravines, leaving huge "prints" the size of tree trunks. The monster eventually makes forays into inhabited areas. Part of the cattle of at least two farms, and two entire families (the Fryes and the Bishops), are attacked and devoured. The frightened town is terrorized by the invisible creature for several days, until Dr. Armitage, Professor Warren Rice, and Dr. Francis Morgan, all of Miskatonic University, arrive with the knowledge and weapons needed to kill it. In the end, its nature is revealed: it is the twin brother of Wilbur Whateley, though it "looked more like the father than Wilbur did."

  29. 5 out of 5

    Holly Kate

    Verbose and creepy

  30. 4 out of 5

    Netanella

    Lovecraft is The Man. He is Mr. Creepiness, and Mr. Loquacious, all rolled into one. He is creeping horror that builds and builds and slowly reveals an ultimate terror that ... love this ... is too profound to comprehend by mere mortal minds. His is all talk and no action. He is action that is revealed by second-hand accounts, or epistolary narratives, but rarely first-hand action sequences. But, by the Elder Gods, it works for me. The Dunwich Horror is another classic short story of the Cthulhu Lovecraft is The Man. He is Mr. Creepiness, and Mr. Loquacious, all rolled into one. He is creeping horror that builds and builds and slowly reveals an ultimate terror that ... love this ... is too profound to comprehend by mere mortal minds. His is all talk and no action. He is action that is revealed by second-hand accounts, or epistolary narratives, but rarely first-hand action sequences. But, by the Elder Gods, it works for me. The Dunwich Horror is another classic short story of the Cthulhu mythos, about a strange lad named Wilbur Whateley, from the creepy New England village of Dunwich. Born to an albino mother and raised by his strange wizard father, Wilbur exhibits accelerated growth, a keen intelligence for arcane and mystical lore, and a visage and stench that even the local dogs avoid. As he matures, strange happenings begin to occur at the Whateley homestead, which culminate in the big reveal of the Dunwich Horror. Awesome good stuff. Do know, that lots of farm animals were hurt in the making of this story. What I enjoy so much about Lovecraft is his writing style. He is so melodramatic, so over the top, that I could get lost in his forest of words for hours. He is, most assuredly, an acquired taste. For good ol' Howard, it's not enough to say, "their homes smelled badly." Instead, Howie would say, "the homes and sheds of Dunwich folk have never been remarkable for olfactory immaculateness." Now doesn't that just want to make the inner Word Nerd in you sit up and go Squee! What I find really interesting, as well, was that Lovecraft, from turn-of-the-century Providence, Rhode Island, was self-educated. I must remind myself to pick up a biography of Lovecraft to get a better insight into his background. What I also find interesting, though, is his apparent dislike for his own community, at least the backwaters of New England. I found this nifty little passage and thought I would share. Perhaps one reason - though it cannot apply to uninformed strangers - is that the natives are now repellently decadent, having gone far along that path of retrogression so common in many New England backwaters. They have come to form a race by themselves, with the well-defined mental and physical stigmata of degeneracy and inbreeding. The average of their intelligence is woefully low, whilst their annals reek of overt viciousness and of half-hidden murders, incests, and deeds of almost unnameable violence and perversity. Whoa, don't hold back, now, Howard. Tell us how you really feel about New England!

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