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Mouse Guard Volume 2: Winter 1152 Black White Limited Edition

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Thislimited edition of Mouse Guard: Winter 1152, presented inthe original size and format (12" x 12") of David Petersen's black-and-white artwork, is hand numbered and perfect for fans of the series. In the Winter of 1152, the Mouse Guard face a food and supply shortage threatening the lives of many mouse through a cold and icy season. Some of the Guard's finest — Saxon, This limited edition of Mouse Guard: Winter 1152, presented in the original size and format (12" x 12") of David Petersen's black-and-white artwork, is hand numbered and perfect for fans of the series. In the Winter of 1152, the Mouse Guard face a food and supply shortage threatening the lives of many mouse through a cold and icy season. Some of the Guard's finest — Saxon, Kenzie, Lieam, and Sadie, led by Celanawe, the legendary Black Axe — traverse the snow-blanketed territories acting as diplomats to improve relations between the mouse cities and the Guard, and find themselves on a race against time to deliver crucial medicines. This is a winter not every Guard may survive… Collects the second Mouse Guard series by Russ Manning Award-winner David Petersen.


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Thislimited edition of Mouse Guard: Winter 1152, presented inthe original size and format (12" x 12") of David Petersen's black-and-white artwork, is hand numbered and perfect for fans of the series. In the Winter of 1152, the Mouse Guard face a food and supply shortage threatening the lives of many mouse through a cold and icy season. Some of the Guard's finest — Saxon, This limited edition of Mouse Guard: Winter 1152, presented in the original size and format (12" x 12") of David Petersen's black-and-white artwork, is hand numbered and perfect for fans of the series. In the Winter of 1152, the Mouse Guard face a food and supply shortage threatening the lives of many mouse through a cold and icy season. Some of the Guard's finest — Saxon, Kenzie, Lieam, and Sadie, led by Celanawe, the legendary Black Axe — traverse the snow-blanketed territories acting as diplomats to improve relations between the mouse cities and the Guard, and find themselves on a race against time to deliver crucial medicines. This is a winter not every Guard may survive… Collects the second Mouse Guard series by Russ Manning Award-winner David Petersen.

30 review for Mouse Guard Volume 2: Winter 1152 Black White Limited Edition

  1. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    Everything I liked about the first book is continued here, with two added elements besides. 1. Of all the elements in these books, the characterization is probably the weakest. It's just not the focus of the story. However, in this second book, we get to know the characters *much* better, and it added a lot for me. 2. Even better, we get to see more of the world of the mice. We meet the hares and see the relationship with the mice. We see a city that used to be occupied by the ferrets, (we Everything I liked about the first book is continued here, with two added elements besides. 1. Of all the elements in these books, the characterization is probably the weakest. It's just not the focus of the story. However, in this second book, we get to know the characters *much* better, and it added a lot for me. 2. Even better, we get to see more of the world of the mice. We meet the hares and see the relationship with the mice. We see a city that used to be occupied by the ferrets, (we haven't seen them yet, but there has been talk of a war with them.) Combined with the detailed art, these hints at the larger world hint at a huge, deep, and uniquely detailed world. I'm really growing fond of it....

  2. 4 out of 5

    Seth T.

    In Winter 1152, David Petersen continues his tale of mouse intrigue, glory, and honour apace. Rather than having the squashed rebellion of Fall 1152 simply fade into memory as a one-off plot to give the first volume some heft, we see that these things have lasting consequences and that the flames that leapt up in open rebellion still smoulder in traitorous saboutage. This volumes lays more foundation for upcoming books as Petersen explores not just the relationships between the guardsmice, but In Winter 1152, David Petersen continues his tale of mouse intrigue, glory, and honour apace. Rather than having the squashed rebellion of Fall 1152 simply fade into memory as a one-off plot to give the first volume some heft, we see that these things have lasting consequences and that the flames that leapt up in open rebellion still smoulder in traitorous saboutage. This volumes lays more foundation for upcoming books as Petersen explores not just the relationships between the guardsmice, but investigates the political relationship between the cities between which Gwendolyn's mouseguard plays mediator. Further, it explores the recent history of the war with the weasels of Darkheather and hints at a dark future. As much as I enjoyed Fall 1152, I think I may have preferred Winter 1152. The stakes are raised and we get to see more fantastic development of character as these mice begin to solidify themselves through Petersen's narrative track. I can't wait to see what happens next.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    It's like an adult Redwall. It's not bad, but there is something about it that leaves me a bit cold. The artwork is wonderful but the Mice Templar is better storywise, I think.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

    As a special reward for May, we bought her the second Mouse Guard. I was a little frustrated to learn a) it hasn't come out in soft-cover yet and b) Volume 3 iss only barely beginning to come out in issues! My daughter is obsessed. She is going to dress as Gwendolyn for Halloween this year. Her drawing quality took a giant leap when she started drawing guardsmice. She writes her own comics (2-3 panels of mice facing off aginst bullfrogs and the like). This volume doesn't have quite the epic-span As a special reward for May, we bought her the second Mouse Guard. I was a little frustrated to learn a) it hasn't come out in soft-cover yet and b) Volume 3 iss only barely beginning to come out in issues! My daughter is obsessed. She is going to dress as Gwendolyn for Halloween this year. Her drawing quality took a giant leap when she started drawing guardsmice. She writes her own comics (2-3 panels of mice facing off aginst bullfrogs and the like). This volume doesn't have quite the epic-span feel of the first volume, and does well because of it. The characters are more deeply drawn, both in personality and in increasing details in dress and equipment. Occasionally the settings show a bit too much of their inspirational source - I swear one of the backgrounds of the arches in Darkheather is lifted straight from a picture of the graet mosque in Cordoba. Even so, Darkheather is a damned good stand-in for Tolkien's Moria. The larger plot, of addressing Midnight's critique of the Mouse Territories' governing structure is a great way to fill-in the back-story to the rebellion that drove the first book. It is a good thing when a second volume makes a first volume better (George Lucas take note).

  5. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    Reread this one today. I have mixed feelings. The story was fun and I think the art works perfectly to illustrate this world. But I found the book fitted bogged down with exposition. I really didn't care about the complex relationships and when one character was talking about another character I had very little idea who they were actually talking about (this may be due to Peterson, but I'm willing to accept that I just wasn't paying attention - but out of a lack of interest).

  6. 5 out of 5

    Felipe

    "It matters not what you fight but what you fight for"

  7. 5 out of 5

    Quentin Wallace

    The second volume of this series was almost as good as the first. The art is tremendous in this series and the story isn't far behind. I've heard many people say they think this series would be good for younger readers, but really I'm not seeing that. The characters are talking animals, but the language and situations are not aimed at younger readers. Well, maybe YA type readers, but not children. I don't mean the book is loaded with curse words, but it's somewhat old English type dialogue, plus The second volume of this series was almost as good as the first. The art is tremendous in this series and the story isn't far behind. I've heard many people say they think this series would be good for younger readers, but really I'm not seeing that. The characters are talking animals, but the language and situations are not aimed at younger readers. Well, maybe YA type readers, but not children. I don't mean the book is loaded with curse words, but it's somewhat old English type dialogue, plus I think some of the political intrigue would be lost on really young readers. In any case, this is a really cool, epic story. Part of me says if you read it and picture the characters as human you get a more "mature" story, but at the same time that would totally defeat the purpose. Just a really good read for those looking for something a little different in the fantasy genre.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Václav

    Petersen's world of mice is getting deeper (literally :-) ), wider, more complex and more naturalistic. Death, betrayal, fear of danger, struggle, it has it all. Winter is a hostile season and this Mouse Guard book can show it. And I liked it. Very much. The story is not epic, it is more subtle and rather personal, but very well told. The art is as always beautiful, rather on the realistic side, firm ink lines with perfect colouring. I'm really looking forward to next book of this story arc. I Petersen's world of mice is getting deeper (literally :-) ), wider, more complex and more naturalistic. Death, betrayal, fear of danger, struggle, it has it all. Winter is a hostile season and this Mouse Guard book can show it. And I liked it. Very much. The story is not epic, it is more subtle and rather personal, but very well told. The art is as always beautiful, rather on the realistic side, firm ink lines with perfect colouring. I'm really looking forward to next book of this story arc. I really do.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bronwyn

    My first reaction after finishing this book: "Aw, man...it's over." I was instantly captivated by Mouse Guard: Fall 1152 and had to read the next volume as soon as possible. Being a slow reader, however, and what with it being the holiday season, I didn't read Winter 1152 as quickly as I intended. Personal gripes aside, this volume was every bit as lovely as the first, both plotwise and in illustration. The ending was very touching as well. I believe Mouse Guard can teach readers about the values My first reaction after finishing this book: "Aw, man...it's over." I was instantly captivated by Mouse Guard: Fall 1152 and had to read the next volume as soon as possible. Being a slow reader, however, and what with it being the holiday season, I didn't read Winter 1152 as quickly as I intended. Personal gripes aside, this volume was every bit as lovely as the first, both plotwise and in illustration. The ending was very touching as well. I believe Mouse Guard can teach readers about the values of friendship, courage, and fealty, no matter how small or unassuming the source.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Fitzgerald

    A dark story with exquisite artwork (and the occasional piece of terrible poetry).

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lumen

    Mouse Guard never fails to fill me with the warm & cozies. My favourite fireside series.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Winegar

    Huh. I guess I did read the second book in a series first. I wondered about that while I was reading it. And that is where I end this unhelpful review.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Lanter

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Unfortunately, the second volume of Mouse Guard was substantially less enjoyable than the first. Several cliches show up in the plot and characters. The biggest problem is that other than the old mouse, I felt like I barely knew the mice any better by the end of this volume than during the first. I know this book is geared towards kids, but most fantasy books I've read have somewhat flat characters and they still have more depth than the ones here. The second problem is the very cliche and Unfortunately, the second volume of Mouse Guard was substantially less enjoyable than the first. Several cliches show up in the plot and characters. The biggest problem is that other than the old mouse, I felt like I barely knew the mice any better by the end of this volume than during the first. I know this book is geared towards kids, but most fantasy books I've read have somewhat flat characters and they still have more depth than the ones here. The second problem is the very cliche and boring love story that appears here. The romance here feels very shallow and completely uninteresting. It is true that males and females who spend enough time together start to get romantically interested, but that alone does not make for an interesting love story. To make matters worse, Mouse Guard commits an even bigger cliche sin. Whenever there is someone old, they have to die to make way for a younger hero. That is exactly what ends up happening here and while the character that dies is cool, it is something that has been done so many times that it has less of an emotional impact than it should. I actually started rolling my eyes as I read, because I could see the death pages before it happened. This doesn't mean the plot is terrible. Its not. It is just that if you've read some fantasy before (and I'm far from well-read in the genre), this volume retreads a lot of well worn paths. The art is beautiful in this volume again and that made reading Mouse Guard feel mostly worth it. I would be lying if I said that the decline in quality from the first volume was not disappointing, but perhaps a younger mind who has not read as much would easily see past the things that hurt my enjoyment of this book.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    A much more grounded story than the first Mouse Guard volume. Instead of an epic, sweeping tale with no time to develop most of its components, we get a much smaller story of the Guard just trying to make it back to their home with supplies. This makes for a far more enjoyable read, as it doesn't take huge leaps forward in story, instead staying very close to our main heroes as they battle their way back to Lockhaven. That said, I still find the series a little silly at times. It takes itself so A much more grounded story than the first Mouse Guard volume. Instead of an epic, sweeping tale with no time to develop most of its components, we get a much smaller story of the Guard just trying to make it back to their home with supplies. This makes for a far more enjoyable read, as it doesn't take huge leaps forward in story, instead staying very close to our main heroes as they battle their way back to Lockhaven. That said, I still find the series a little silly at times. It takes itself so deadly serious, which would be fine if there ever felt like there were grander, personal stakes involved. There's a scene where one mouse kisses another mouse out of absolutely nowhere, and we're meant to think of it as a tender moment. I'm sorry, but mice kissing each other looks ridiculous. Also, in one of the more important scenes of mice fighting an owl with swords, I couldn't help but laugh at the visual. It's definitely not intended to be funny, but it just comes across that way, so having these cartoony visuals approached with such a dire tone just takes me out of it a little. As I said in my review of the first volume, Petersen has done a wondrous job creating a medieval mouse world, I just wish he'd live in it a little more. The short nature of these stories does not really give him that ability, so big choices come off a little rushed and undeveloped. I really wanted to love this series, but so far I think it's just "fine."

  15. 5 out of 5

    Thurston Hunger

    As mentioned in my Spring 1152 review, we accidentally read this one first, and it was tougher to comprehend lacking the back story. But this journey story, visiting the Weasely underworld and a nice macabre interaction with bats that for my young darklings was much enjoyed. Speaking of bats, there is sort of a legendary mouse named the Black Axe who your kids will likely love as mine did, but his arc has perhaps a tragic tinge to it, so be forewarned with more sensitive young ones. As this is As mentioned in my Spring 1152 review, we accidentally read this one first, and it was tougher to comprehend lacking the back story. But this journey story, visiting the Weasely underworld and a nice macabre interaction with bats that for my young darklings was much enjoyed. Speaking of bats, there is sort of a legendary mouse named the Black Axe who your kids will likely love as mine did, but his arc has perhaps a tragic tinge to it, so be forewarned with more sensitive young ones. As this is mice, and a (nice-looking) graphic novel...the old notion that cartoon "people" are not real people helps with distance over death. At the beginning of each story there are often songs (in the first book I think they are readings/aphorisms mostly and shorter...). My boys kind of glazed over these until I (gulp) tried singing them...seemed to make their rendering less painful for the boys. Try at your own risk ;> Hmmm, Petersen's web site http://www.mouseguard.net/ sites NY Times Best Seller nods, so perhaps this is not quite the rare jewel I had thought. Additionally, I see merchandise and a Role Playing Game...hmmmm. On the bright side, I do see mention of another series, "The Black Axe 1099-1116” prequel beginning in 2010.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Three and a half stars. The illustrations in this sequel are still gorgeous, and after mentioning Dinotopia in my review of the first book, I was tickled to see this Foreword by James Gurney. He writes, "With impeccable taste Petersen chooses dramatic camera angles and striking compositions, not merely to tell the story, but to expand the world. The colors transition from golden firelight to pale blue moonlight." I guarantee the constant snowfall in this book will make you feel cold. However, the Three and a half stars. The illustrations in this sequel are still gorgeous, and after mentioning Dinotopia in my review of the first book, I was tickled to see this Foreword by James Gurney. He writes, "With impeccable taste Petersen chooses dramatic camera angles and striking compositions, not merely to tell the story, but to expand the world. The colors transition from golden firelight to pale blue moonlight." I guarantee the constant snowfall in this book will make you feel cold. However, the text left me a little cold as well. I noticed many editorial mistakes; the print was tiny; I couldn't tell when words were bolded. Jumping from one plotline to the other often confused me, and though the following chapter would begin with a paragraph describing what the reader just saw, I was annoyed that I had to wait for that bit to be sure what happened. Still, I'm going to keep following this series for the art if nothing else. It makes me want to draw mice so I can do the shading inside their ears.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rick Silva

    With supplies depleted as winter approaches, the guardmice send messengers to the nearby towns to request needed supplies and to invite the leaders to a summit to find common solutions to the threats facing the mice. David Petersen envisions a medieval-style society made up of mice and the warrior-mice who serve as their protectors. While one group is split up as they struggle to make it home, treachery lurks in the halls of Lockhaven. This was my first introduction to Mouse Guard, aside from a With supplies depleted as winter approaches, the guardmice send messengers to the nearby towns to request needed supplies and to invite the leaders to a summit to find common solutions to the threats facing the mice. David Petersen envisions a medieval-style society made up of mice and the warrior-mice who serve as their protectors. While one group is split up as they struggle to make it home, treachery lurks in the halls of Lockhaven. This was my first introduction to Mouse Guard, aside from a couple of their FCBD books, and I was very impressed. The fight scenes are harrowing and intense. The characters go through a whole range of interpersonal conflicts even as they loyally fight to save each other and their home. The art is absolutely gorgeous, and the story built to a powerful climax, and followed with an epilogue that left plenty of room for further adventures. Bonus material in this hardcover graphic novel edition include an introduction by Dinotopia creator James Gurney, maps, and pinup art by Geof Darrow, Stan Sakai, Craig Rousseau, Nate Pride, Sean Wang, and Jane Irwin.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Hyathin

    Better than MG: Fall, so if you liked that one at all, pick this up. The art is great, as before, though I completely disagree with the choice of using all caps for all of the mouse dialogue (different kinds of animals actually use different lettering styles). But that is really my only complaint. The story kept me engaged the entire time, and I found the winter season to be most enjoyable for Mouse Guard. Winter is just the most mysterious and magical of seasons, IMO. It was great, too, to Better than MG: Fall, so if you liked that one at all, pick this up. The art is great, as before, though I completely disagree with the choice of using all caps for all of the mouse dialogue (different kinds of animals actually use different lettering styles). But that is really my only complaint. The story kept me engaged the entire time, and I found the winter season to be most enjoyable for Mouse Guard. Winter is just the most mysterious and magical of seasons, IMO. It was great, too, to learn a bit more about the MG world and other creatures in it, such as the weasels, hares, and bats. I would be sad if all the adversaries and allies were flat, nothing more than monsters or beasts of burden. All I can hope is that the world continues to deepen in future publications.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    It is really easy to fall in love with the merry band of mouseketeers. . . no, not the Disney ones. . .as they go off on a quest in the dead of winter to gather supplies and alliances in response to recent internal tumults and betrayals. Although the plot is not too taxing, or even that original it seems, the artwork is wonderful, almost enchanting I would say. You do get some character development and they square off against natural pitfalls and mortal natural enemies, but they are adorable It is really easy to fall in love with the merry band of mouseketeers. . . no, not the Disney ones. . .as they go off on a quest in the dead of winter to gather supplies and alliances in response to recent internal tumults and betrayals. Although the plot is not too taxing, or even that original it seems, the artwork is wonderful, almost enchanting I would say. You do get some character development and they square off against natural pitfalls and mortal natural enemies, but they are adorable even so. And I think these books would be a great introduction to graphic novels for younger readers that might propel them into more-adult level fantasy as they mature.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Guy Gonzalez

    It's been several years since I read the first volume of Mouse Guard, but Winter 1152 stands on its own merits as Petersen's poetic precision and vibrant visuals once again combine to deliver the epic fantasy goods. His ideas aren't new by any stretch, but his engaging characters, tantalizing setting and hints of the larger world behind the scenes leave you wanting more. (And there's even an RPG for that!) And, as always, Archaia does a top-notch job of bringing it all together in a shelf-worthy It's been several years since I read the first volume of Mouse Guard, but Winter 1152 stands on its own merits as Petersen's poetic precision and vibrant visuals once again combine to deliver the epic fantasy goods. His ideas aren't new by any stretch, but his engaging characters, tantalizing setting and hints of the larger world behind the scenes leave you wanting more. (And there's even an RPG for that!) And, as always, Archaia does a top-notch job of bringing it all together in a shelf-worthy package that's worth every penny. Highly recommended!

  21. 4 out of 5

    James

    Mice, who guard things. The plots are pretty basic, and young-adult fantasy novel earnest, and the art is fantastic. The worldbuilding is excellent as long as you don't think two hard about why there are medieval-ish mice in what seems (by the fauna) to be Michigan, why Mice and Weasels have thumbs and none of the animals do, and why the population seems about 1/10th the size required for the civilization shown. You can just posit some Rats of NIMH action in the background and move on. The art Mice, who guard things. The plots are pretty basic, and young-adult fantasy novel earnest, and the art is fantastic. The worldbuilding is excellent as long as you don't think two hard about why there are medieval-ish mice in what seems (by the fauna) to be Michigan, why Mice and Weasels have thumbs and none of the animals do, and why the population seems about 1/10th the size required for the civilization shown. You can just posit some Rats of NIMH action in the background and move on. The art is fantastic!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ghostcat

    Just after reading the first volume (Autumn 1152) I started this one, and I think I liked the story a little bit more. Some scenes are quite fascinating and intense, but a little bit frustrating too, as they references to an era that we will not see and that looked so interesting. I managed to attach myself to some characters in this one and the plot was deeper. I'd love to read a third one if it goes better again.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Trae Stratton

    The cinematic paneling and storytelling that started in "Fall" continues here in "Winter" making this a joy to read. I enjoy recharging my batteries between longer novels with graphic novels and this one was perfectly suited to the task. Looking forward to the next installment.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    I talk about this book here - https://youtu.be/mJqgwgDPCuE

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Lupa

    These turned out to be very beautiful graphic novels, and scale well to different readers ages.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Naomi

    Volume 2 is possibly more beautiful than V.1. There is continuing intrigue amongst the mice, further mysteries and additional character development. And, a battle with a horned owl!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Matt Piechocinski

    I have trouble distinguishing between the mice. However, I do like Lieam, and thought it was pretty cool when he took up the mantle of the Black Axe. I also think it's a good comic for kids.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Stacy Renee (LazyDayLit)

    I really hope I can get my hands on the rest of these. The art is amazing and the story is really good, too.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    These poor mice! Their lives are so tough, but they are so, so cute.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    The artwork is just beautiful and the story is engaging and wonderful.

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