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I Hate My Neck And Other Thoughts About Women's Share / Ya Nenavizhu Svoyu Sheyu I Drugie Mysli O Zhenskoy Dole

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With her disarming, intimate, completely accessible voice, and dry sense of humor, Nora Ephron shares with us her ups and downs in I Feel Bad About My Neck, a candid, hilarious look at women who are getting older and dealing with the tribulations of maintenance, menopause, empty nests, and life itself. The woman who brought us When Harry Met Sally . . ., Sleepless in With her disarming, intimate, completely accessible voice, and dry sense of humor, Nora Ephron shares with us her ups and downs in I Feel Bad About My Neck, a candid, hilarious look at women who are getting older and dealing with the tribulations of maintenance, menopause, empty nests, and life itself. The woman who brought us When Harry Met Sally . . ., Sleepless in Seattle, You've Got Mail, and Bewitched, and the author of best sellers Heartburn, Scribble Scribble, and Crazy Salad, discusses everything--from how much she hates her purse to how much time she spends attempting to stop the clock: the hair dye, the treadmill, the lotions and creams that promise to slow the aging process but never do. Oh, and she can't stand the way her neck looks. But her dermatologist tells her there's no quick fix for that. Ephron chronicles her life as an obsessed cook, passionate city dweller, and hapless parent. She recounts her anything-but-glamorous days as a White House intern during the JFK years ("I am probably the only young woman who ever worked in the Kennedy White House that the President did not make a pass at") and shares how she fell in and out of love with Bill Clinton--from a distance, of course. But mostly she speaks frankly and uproariously about life as a woman of a certain age. Utterly courageous, wickedly funny, and unexpectedly moving in its truth telling, I Feel Bad About My Neck is a book of wisdom, advice, and laugh-out-loud moments, a scrumptious, irresistible treat.


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With her disarming, intimate, completely accessible voice, and dry sense of humor, Nora Ephron shares with us her ups and downs in I Feel Bad About My Neck, a candid, hilarious look at women who are getting older and dealing with the tribulations of maintenance, menopause, empty nests, and life itself. The woman who brought us When Harry Met Sally . . ., Sleepless in With her disarming, intimate, completely accessible voice, and dry sense of humor, Nora Ephron shares with us her ups and downs in I Feel Bad About My Neck, a candid, hilarious look at women who are getting older and dealing with the tribulations of maintenance, menopause, empty nests, and life itself. The woman who brought us When Harry Met Sally . . ., Sleepless in Seattle, You've Got Mail, and Bewitched, and the author of best sellers Heartburn, Scribble Scribble, and Crazy Salad, discusses everything--from how much she hates her purse to how much time she spends attempting to stop the clock: the hair dye, the treadmill, the lotions and creams that promise to slow the aging process but never do. Oh, and she can't stand the way her neck looks. But her dermatologist tells her there's no quick fix for that. Ephron chronicles her life as an obsessed cook, passionate city dweller, and hapless parent. She recounts her anything-but-glamorous days as a White House intern during the JFK years ("I am probably the only young woman who ever worked in the Kennedy White House that the President did not make a pass at") and shares how she fell in and out of love with Bill Clinton--from a distance, of course. But mostly she speaks frankly and uproariously about life as a woman of a certain age. Utterly courageous, wickedly funny, and unexpectedly moving in its truth telling, I Feel Bad About My Neck is a book of wisdom, advice, and laugh-out-loud moments, a scrumptious, irresistible treat.

30 review for I Hate My Neck And Other Thoughts About Women's Share / Ya Nenavizhu Svoyu Sheyu I Drugie Mysli O Zhenskoy Dole

  1. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    Sometimes it takes a friend to get you to read a book. I Feel Bad About My Neck has been on my physical bookshelves for years. I’d look at it and look at my neck and think, “Do you really want to read this book?” I’ve got six friends on GR with the beautiful name of Julie but it was the clever one that wanted to be certain to stand out, the Julie preceded by a flower, that finally gave me the push to read this book. Thank you. Heartburn, published in 1983 was my first encounter with Nora Ephron. Sometimes it takes a friend to get you to read a book. I Feel Bad About My Neck has been on my physical bookshelves for years. I’d look at it and look at my neck and think, “Do you really want to read this book?” I’ve got six friends on GR with the beautiful name of Julie but it was the clever one that wanted to be certain to stand out, the Julie preceded by a flower, that finally gave me the push to read this book. Thank you. Heartburn, published in 1983 was my first encounter with Nora Ephron. I remember this as a funny, romantic read. Though humor is subjective Ephron’s sense of mirth is fine with me. Never having read any of her other books I certainly am familiar with her films, When Harry Met Sally, Sleepless in Seattle,, and You’ve Got Mail. There are many others. Though I don’t feel bad about my neck anymore many other things have taken its place. Who knew I should worry about the purse I carry, varicose veins, coloring my hair, manicures, pedicures, the food I serve, my skin, and the dreaded post-menopausal hair, especially the bounty of this growing above my lips. This was the perfect book for a dreary, rainy day. I Feel Bad About My Neck lightened my mood and reminded me how great it is to be a woman, turtleneck and all. A special voice is gone as Nora Ephron passed away in 2012 but her talent lives on. Treat yourself to one of her books or a movie for which she was the screenwriter, producer or director. Have a good laugh in honor of one classy woman.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Darce

    Despite the clever and sometimes funny observations about aging, I couldn't shake the feeling that this book of essays was...trivial. Except for the final chapter (Considering the Alternative), Ephron spends a lot of time writing about superficial aspects of growing older (the skin on her neck, her disorganized purse, her worsening eyesight) that make her seem shallow and self-absorbed. In the essay focused on all the hours she devotes to maintaining her appearance (On Maintenance), she Despite the clever and sometimes funny observations about aging, I couldn't shake the feeling that this book of essays was...trivial. Except for the final chapter (Considering the Alternative), Ephron spends a lot of time writing about superficial aspects of growing older (the skin on her neck, her disorganized purse, her worsening eyesight) that make her seem shallow and self-absorbed. In the essay focused on all the hours she devotes to maintaining her appearance (On Maintenance), she describes her reaction to passing a homeless woman on the street: "I am only about eight hours away from looking exactly like that woman on the street--with frizzled flyaway gray hair I would probably have if I stopped dyeing mine; with a potbelly I would definitely develop if I ate just half of what I think about eating every day; with dirty nails and chapped lips and mustache and bushy eyebrows that would be my destiny if I ever spent two weeks on a desert island." While all that may be true, Ephron's reaction to the consequences of homelessness on this woman's appearance was surprising. I think I expected her to be embarrassed by the time and money she spends "on maintenance."

  3. 4 out of 5

    Beli_grrl

    I listened to the audio book on CD, which is read by the author. That was not the way to go with this one. She has odd inflections and an unnatural reading cadence. For example, she might read like this: We lived (pause) in a white house (pause) and I didn't (pause) like it. Partly because of her reading style and partly because of the content, I had trouble getting into it. It's supposed to be funny but isn't especially. She describes all the "maintenance" older women do to keep up their appearances I listened to the audio book on CD, which is read by the author. That was not the way to go with this one. She has odd inflections and an unnatural reading cadence. For example, she might read like this: We lived (pause) in a white house (pause) and I didn't (pause) like it. Partly because of her reading style and partly because of the content, I had trouble getting into it. It's supposed to be funny but isn't especially. She describes all the "maintenance" older women do to keep up their appearances at great length and talks about these things as if they are mandatory, when in fact, they are not. She is not a person that a poor, blue-collar woman like me who shops at Target can well relate to. At least not at first. For instance, she talks about the agony of sitting at the beauty parlor all day to get her hair colored and how she spends more money on it each year than her first car cost. And I compose an imaginary email to her in my head where I turn her on to the beauty aisle at Long's Drug Store where you can buy a box of color that takes less than half an hour to use for less than $10. Later in the book, however, she rather wins me over. She describes the raptures of getting engrossed in a great novel in a way that I (or you, I bet) could totally relate to. The real world is tedious and seems unreal when you're dying to get back to your book. When she's not talking about shopping, she and I do seem to inhabit the same planet and I can see that she has some wisdom to impart. And I admire her honesty. She mentions all the upbeat chicken-soup-for-the-soul type of books that are out there for older women and says they're full of crap. Being old isn't that great. In this day and age where everyone pretends that whatever age they're at is the new 25, it's refreshing. This might appeal to a woman who is looking for some light nonfiction to read. Do NOT get the audio version, though. I really think it would have been a totally different experience to read it and I probably would have taken to it much more quickly.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kelli

    It's been a rough couple years...I mean days. I grabbed this book off the shelf in the library and sat behind my son as he played some cartoony anatomy game wherein he places organs in the correct spot on a very happy looking skeleton (even though I have noted several key organs are simply not there...but I digress.). Anyway, I really had to leave the library because I was cracking up. This collection of essays includes some that are very funny and some that are less so but I had several laugh It's been a rough couple years...I mean days. I grabbed this book off the shelf in the library and sat behind my son as he played some cartoony anatomy game wherein he places organs in the correct spot on a very happy looking skeleton (even though I have noted several key organs are simply not there...but I digress.). Anyway, I really had to leave the library because I was cracking up. This collection of essays includes some that are very funny and some that are less so but I had several laugh out loud moments in the few hours it took to read this book. There were some seriously funny comments and that is about all I was looking for. My favorite feeling is when my stomach hurts from laughing. Mission accomplished! A light, fun read. 3.5 stars Update: I have thought of this book so often over the past few months...mainly because I seem to have "tech neck," which is the deep groove from always looking down at phones & iPads. I insist mine is from reading books, but nonetheless lately I can truly relate!

  5. 4 out of 5

    ❀Julie

    I was so sad for this book to come to an end.I listened to the audiobook, narrated by Nora Ephron herself, which I so enjoyed because it was in such an amusing tone that no other narrator could have captured.There were numerous wise and funny lines throughout that had me constantly rewinding...just so I could hear them again.I hadn’t heard of her books until she passed away, and although I was drawn to this catchy title, I don’t think I could have fully appreciated it at that time since I wasn’t I was so sad for this book to come to an end.  I listened to the audiobook, narrated by Nora Ephron herself, which I so enjoyed because it was in such an amusing tone that no other narrator could have captured.  There were numerous wise and funny lines throughout that had me constantly rewinding...just so I could hear them again.   I hadn’t heard of her books until she passed away, and although I was drawn to this catchy title, I don’t think I could have fully appreciated it at that time since I wasn’t quite “feeling bad about my neck”...yet.  But I could still relate to a lot just being a woman and a mother.  Not all of her essays were on aging, nor could I relate to them all, but I loved every single one of them, because her candid telling and dry sense of humor made them enjoyable.   Learning about her career, marriages, mothering, life in New York City, favorite foods, and the wit with which she dealt with such things was fascinating to me.  I laughed hysterically when she described the state of her disheveled purse--how she managed to describe my own purse had me in tears.  I loved her essay on “Rapture”, describing how the books she loved transported her to another world.  I could so relate, even to some of the books and authors she loved.  I felt a sense of melancholy many times, especialy the way she talked about her life and her age, and it made me sad that she died.  It was deeply affecting to me when she “danced around the ‘D’ word”, talking about the loss of her friends later in life and how there was nothing to be done about it.  Definitely makes one think about life.  5 stars and I’ll be listening to this again, possibly with a scarf around my neck.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Roxane

    This was such a charming book. Aging is clearly very fraught and the sharp wit of the essays in this book is quite wonderful.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    Multi-talented Nora Ephron was a journalist, director, and author. In her heyday Ephron wrote the screenplays for some very popular movies including 'Julie and Julia', 'You've Got Mail', 'Sleepless in Seattle', 'When Harry Met Sally', and 'Silkwood.' Nora Ephron This audiobook - read by the author - contains a collection of humorous essays written when Ephron was 60 years old...and stopped having birthdays. In fact Ephron notes that, upon publication of this book, she'll have been 60 for five Multi-talented Nora Ephron was a journalist, director, and author. In her heyday Ephron wrote the screenplays for some very popular movies including 'Julie and Julia', 'You've Got Mail', 'Sleepless in Seattle', 'When Harry Met Sally', and 'Silkwood.' Nora Ephron This audiobook - read by the author - contains a collection of humorous essays written when Ephron was 60 years old...and stopped having birthdays. In fact Ephron notes that, upon publication of this book, she'll have been 60 for five years (ha ha ha 😊). As might be expected, many of the essays touch on the subject of aging. The book's title, for instance, refers to the fact that 'older ladies' in Ephron's circle always wear turtlenecks or scarves to hide those crepey necks. (I think this is an exaggeration but I get the idea.) Ephron's semi tongue-in-cheek description of her maintainance regime includes regular coloring sessions at the hairdresser followed by bi-weekly blowouts, frequent manicures and pedicures, a rigorous exercise schedule, constant dieting, botox injections, bath oils, and endless containers of expensive lotions for specific parts of the body (hands, face, feet, etc.) - which must NEVER cross over. All this is costly and time-consuming...but a girl's gotta do what a girl's gotta do to keep from looking like the bag lady on the corner. Ephron lovingly describes her large rent-controlled apartment in Manhattan's Apthorp building, which was close to every kind of store, hairdresser, nail salon, restaurant, etc. that a person could want - as well as a playground for the kids. Ephron lived in this heavenly residence for many years until - with the end of rent control - the rent was set to rise to $12,000 a month. Wow! Apthorp Building In another entertaining story Ephron speaks about her dismay when cabbage strudel disappeared from Manhattan restaurants and bakeries. Ephron was an excellent cook who - like the character in 'Julie and Julia' - worked her way through much of Julia Child's cookbook. However, hard as she tried, Ephron couldn't reproduce the strudel. The writer goes to great lengths, and even consults friends in high places, to try to find this savory delight. Does she succeed? You'll have to read the book to know. Cabbage Strudel Ephron was an intern in President John F. Kennedy's White House and - inspired by one of Kennedy's blabby flings - tells the 'true story' of her relationship with the handsome politician. She also talks about her 'love affair' with Bill Clinton. Nothing scandalous...I don't want to start any rumors. LOL. 😊 John F. Kennedy Bill Clinton Other essays mention Ephron's discomfort with aging, her numerous marriages, her kids, her career, her celebrity neighbors, and her sadness when her best friend became ill and died. Complete honesty: The book lags in places and the author's narrating style - slow with odd emphases - is a little distracting. The essays are aimed at metropolitan 'women of a certain age', but many people would probably enjoy the book. I'd recommend it to readers who want an entertaining light read. You can follow my reviews at https://reviewsbybarbsaffer.blogspot....

  8. 4 out of 5

    Reese

    Sitting in a movie theater back in the eighties, not my eighties -- the 1980s, I am smiling, laughing, just having a good ol' time when suddenly TERMS OF ENDEARMENT goes from funny to ominous to dark as turds that can signal upper g.i. bleeding. I'm thinking, "Shit, no, don't take this story there." I'm not walking out of a movie with Shirley MacLaine and Jack Nicholson in it; that fact means watching a character who's about my age die of cancer. She's got three young kids; I have one and one Sitting in a movie theater back in the eighties, not my eighties -- the 1980s, I am smiling, laughing, just having a good ol' time when suddenly TERMS OF ENDEARMENT goes from funny to ominous to dark as turds that can signal upper g.i. bleeding. I'm thinking, "Shit, no, don't take this story there." I'm not walking out of a movie with Shirley MacLaine and Jack Nicholson in it; that fact means watching a character who's about my age die of cancer. She's got three young kids; I have one and one baking in the pelvic oven. The film deserves praise, but I AM PISSED. We're way past the 1980s; I look as if I could be eighty, and I turn to Nora Ephron to entertain me. Her work (forget HEARTBURN) usually does, and the first chapter doesn't disappoint me. Most of the middle chapters are forgettable even if you have a terrific memory, so I start to anticipate writing a review that is somewhere between neutral and unfavorable(2 stars). But I reach the essay "The Story of My Life in 3,500 Words or Less," and I find material so closely related to remarks I made just hours ago that -- surprise -- I'm liking this book again. Then with only a few stops left before this train reaches "the end of the line," I smell a "terms-of-endearment" experience on the tracks. Well, not quite. Besides, I'm not young and pregnant; so even if the author leaves me in an unlit underground station, the image of Debra Winger in a hospital bed won't be with me. I am actually GLAD that the final two chapters of the book offer an interesting combination of sunshine and charcoal-gray clouds. And despite my lousy memory, I can hold on to lines such as "The empty nest is underrated"(125); "Never let them know"(126); and "I don't know. I hope that's clear"(136). About that last one -- if Nora Ephron and I knew each other, I'd swear she was quoting me.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sue Cook

    The thing is this. Nora and I are not sisters. In "On Maintenance": "When and how did it happen that you absolutely had to have a manicure?" er, never? I also don't care that much about make up or matching handbags or wrinkles. I JUST REALLY DON'T CARE. What I care about is women being raped, beaten up, paid less,not let in, talked down to and generally fucked over because they are women. "I Feel Bad About My Neck" adopts a universal voice but talks only about a sliver of privileged society. It The thing is this. Nora and I are not sisters. In "On Maintenance": "When and how did it happen that you absolutely had to have a manicure?" er, never? I also don't care that much about make up or matching handbags or wrinkles. I JUST REALLY DON'T CARE. What I care about is women being raped, beaten up, paid less,not let in, talked down to and generally fucked over because they are women. "I Feel Bad About My Neck" adopts a universal voice but talks only about a sliver of privileged society. It is feminism-lite, faux solidarity. Don't mistake it for anything serious. However I did read it so it beats Hemingway and gets 2 stars. #shootin'atstars revised rating - another star I think I must have been in an exceedingly bad mood when I read this first time. I read it again yesterday and found much more in it. I still don't have time for the handbags or makeup crap but I found a lot to like about women's friendships, in particular the notion of "one away" (read the book); the section on parents and adolescents is very funny; but this, on heartbreak, was my stand-out : "I fly to NY to see my shrink. I walk into her office and burst into tears. I tell her what my husband has done to me. I tell her my heart is broken. I tell her I'm a total mess and I will never be the same. I can't stop crying. She looks at me and says, "You have to understand something. You were going to leave him eventually."

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lain

    Nora Ephron is, hands-down, one of the funniest women in America. Her novels, movies, and essay collections have brought me to tears by way of laughter more than once. That's why I was a bit disappointed by this collection of essays, loosely tied around the topic of aging. The essays on aging were amusing, but not particularly funny or fresh. It was like eating a day-old doughnut -- still tasty, but probably not worth all the calories. The weird thing -- her non-age-related essays were Nora Ephron is, hands-down, one of the funniest women in America. Her novels, movies, and essay collections have brought me to tears by way of laughter more than once. That's why I was a bit disappointed by this collection of essays, loosely tied around the topic of aging. The essays on aging were amusing, but not particularly funny or fresh. It was like eating a day-old doughnut -- still tasty, but probably not worth all the calories. The weird thing -- her non-age-related essays were brilliant. The piece on her love affair with her apartment was a treasure, as was the one about her life in 3500 words or less. I almost felt like her agent or publisher told her she needed to write about getting old, so she did lip service to the topic but snuck in "other stuff" that in actuality is the best part of the book. If you're an Ephron fan, check it out. Not as great as "Scribble Scribble," but still worth a read.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sue

    For most of you who are my Goodreads friends, you will be too young to really appreciate the humor in this book -- after all, you still have firm, unwrinkled necks which you have probably never even given a single thought. BUT take my word for it, someday you will. And then, you should run right out and find a copy of this book. (Perhaps you can find one cheap in the garage sales that members of my generation will be having as we downsize into assisted living apartments!) Anyway, when it comes For most of you who are my Goodreads friends, you will be too young to really appreciate the humor in this book -- after all, you still have firm, unwrinkled necks which you have probably never even given a single thought. BUT take my word for it, someday you will. And then, you should run right out and find a copy of this book. (Perhaps you can find one cheap in the garage sales that members of my generation will be having as we downsize into assisted living apartments!) Anyway, when it comes to the realities of middle-age, it's always better to laugh than to cry, and this book will make you LOL. (There, I'm using a texting acronym. Do I seem younger now?)

  12. 5 out of 5

    Negin

    I love Nora Ephron and wish that she was still alive so that I could continue to enjoy her witty and funny style of writing. Funny is something that I seem to crave these days. This is only her second book that I’ve read. It’s a quick read and a particularly enjoyable one. Every parent should read her chapter “Parent in Three Stages”. I desperately needed that!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sandy T

    So I bought this book thinking it was going to be full of humor about what happens to women when they reach that "certain age". I was expecting to relate to and be amused by her musings about getting older. And that did happen... certain chapters really made me smile, and I could relate to more than I would like to admit! But for about half the chapters, the only people who might relate to it would be rich, famous, New York socialites. That obviously doesn't describe me, so even though her So I bought this book thinking it was going to be full of humor about what happens to women when they reach that "certain age". I was expecting to relate to and be amused by her musings about getting older. And that did happen... certain chapters really made me smile, and I could relate to more than I would like to admit! But for about half the chapters, the only people who might relate to it would be rich, famous, New York socialites. That obviously doesn't describe me, so even though her writing was engaging, I'm not quite sure why she put it in this particular book. I did however, love her chapter on the "rapture" she feels with a good book. The chapter on "cabbage strudel" I could have lived without...

  14. 5 out of 5

    Malbadeen

    Here's the thing, I would've never listened to this book if it weren't for the fact that years ago I gifted it to someone in those last few moments of Christmas-oh-shit-I-forgot-to-buy-that-person-a-gift hysteria. I was married at the time and was, by default, put in charge of figuring out what EVERYONE should be given. My mother-in-law and I had a so-so relationship. I mean she did accuse me of purposely putting pins in her bed when she stayed the night and got poked a few times with left over Here's the thing, I would've never listened to this book if it weren't for the fact that years ago I gifted it to someone in those last few moments of Christmas-oh-shit-I-forgot-to-buy-that-person-a-gift hysteria. I was married at the time and was, by default, put in charge of figuring out what EVERYONE should be given. My mother-in-law and I had a so-so relationship. I mean she did accuse me of purposely putting pins in her bed when she stayed the night and got poked a few times with left over remnants of my latest creative pursuits, and we weren't exactly the lets-get-a-manicure-together type but she did tell me she loved me once (which caught me so off guard that all I could muster in my shocked state was an awkward, "thank you"). Sooooooo, I saw this book on audio, new she had a long drive home on Christmas, vaguely recognized the name Nora Ephron (honestly I think I kind of sort of confused her with Erma Bombeck), read that is was supposed to be funny and grabbed it. who doesn't like to laugh, right? Had I thought about it for 2.2 seconds it would have occurred to me that giving your 60 something mother in law a book about the horrors of aging (whether their offered up humorously or not) when you are only in your mid 30's is probably not in the best of taste. And now, divorced, in my 40's and hating my own neck I couldn't resist when I saw it at the library. What exactly had my mother-in-law heard as she drove home that Christmas season? Suffice it to say, I doubt she laughed out loud and mostly likely didn't exactly appreciate that the entire book ends with musings on death. oops. As for me - I like a good musing on death and watching my body change is a never ending source of fascination. And as self absorbed as I can be, as much as I think the world is looking and noticing my every new wrinkle, I grew tired of Ephron's endless lamenting about all things physical and material in her life. She spent an entire chapter on the loss an apartment in NY but completely glossed over her 2 divorces. Not that she has to bear her sole about every aspect of her life (If she had the book would have been longer than 3 CD's and I wouldn't have listened to it anyway) but still....an occasional grappling with SOME sense of moral obligation to the world outside herself would have been a little reassuring. The over all message at the end seemed to be spend money on yourself, indulge, you only live once. And don't get me wrong, It's not like I'm toiling away at soup kitchen's during the day and spending my vacations bettering conditions at refuge camps. No. no. I just like to *feel guilt* about NOT doing that. (In real life I'm day dreaming about a pair of boots that I'm pretty sure make me look 39 instead of 40 and according to the salesman at Nordstrom showed that I "have nothing to hide" - what? that had NOTHING to do with the commission! He was just an honest guy doing an honest days work). *also Nora Ephron throws paper away and I'd like to know what the F that is about - who the hell THROWS PAPER AWAY?! Answer up NY! **also a 25 year old guy was in my car last night and not only picked up and glanced at the cover of this but further went on to read the description of how she "speaks frankly and uproariously about life as a woman of a certain age". And that shit was em.bar.ass.ing!!!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly

    It's unavoidable, we are all growing old. And in this book, Nora Ephron has decided to tackle some of the more obvious annoyances of aging. I have to say that when I first started this book, I thought, "Wow, she REALLY doesn't like herself!" But as the narrative continued, I realized that Ephron simply addressed the issues that all women grapple with as they are aging. And she does it in a highly humorous way. The audiobook was great! I'm sure the print version was entertaining as well, but I It's unavoidable, we are all growing old. And in this book, Nora Ephron has decided to tackle some of the more obvious annoyances of aging. I have to say that when I first started this book, I thought, "Wow, she REALLY doesn't like herself!" But as the narrative continued, I realized that Ephron simply addressed the issues that all women grapple with as they are aging. And she does it in a highly humorous way. The audiobook was great! I'm sure the print version was entertaining as well, but I highly doubt that it captured Ephron's wry humour and sarcasm so well. Only the audiobook could aptly epitomize those qualities. I loved hearing her narrate her own thoughts and experiences. She had a rare ability to emote her life events in a way that allowed for a fundamental connection to develop with the listener/reader. 3.5/5 ⭐️

  16. 5 out of 5

    Phillip Smith

    It won't change your life, but it is quite a treat for a sunny afternoon. I read most of it lying in the sunshine on my bed shortly after lunch on a Saturday. Ephron, like Sedaris & Degeneres, has a gift for expressing mundane thoughts in the most delightful phrases. The one that's in my head right now is when she describes loving cabbage strudel in the 1960s: "I don't want to get too sentimental, but it's practically the only thing I remember about my first marriage." You'll be chuckling the It won't change your life, but it is quite a treat for a sunny afternoon. I read most of it lying in the sunshine on my bed shortly after lunch on a Saturday. Ephron, like Sedaris & Degeneres, has a gift for expressing mundane thoughts in the most delightful phrases. The one that's in my head right now is when she describes loving cabbage strudel in the 1960s: "I don't want to get too sentimental, but it's practically the only thing I remember about my first marriage." You'll be chuckling the whole way through, with the occasional howl or two.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ammar

    Funny Intimate Entertaining Loved it The life of a woman in NYC

  18. 4 out of 5

    Seth Fiegerman

    I'm not a woman. Nor am I a parent or a successful screenwriter or a particularly ambitious cook. But I still found myself nodding my head over and over as I related to Ephron's insights on life. She writes plainly but with great humor and candidness about her abusive relationship with her apartment building, why parenting is more about quantity time than quality time and how something always seems to go wrong when she tries to exercise. It's the portions about New York that really got me, I'm not a woman. Nor am I a parent or a successful screenwriter or a particularly ambitious cook. But I still found myself nodding my head over and over as I related to Ephron's insights on life. She writes plainly but with great humor and candidness about her abusive relationship with her apartment building, why parenting is more about quantity time than quality time and how something always seems to go wrong when she tries to exercise. It's the portions about New York that really got me, though. She does a better job than any writer I've read of capturing the characters, changes and charm of the city, and the magical thinking of its residents. "New York is a very livable city. But when you move away and become a visitor, the city seems to turn against you. It's much more expensive... and much more unfriendly. Things change in New York, things change all the time. You don't mind this when you live here; when you live here, it's part of the caffeinated romance of this city that never sleep. But when you move away you experience hangs as a betrayal." When she is eventually forced to move out of her beloved 8 bedroom apartment because the rent keeps going up, she remembers a truth that extends well beyond real estate: "What failure of imagination had caused me to forget that life was full of other possibilities, including the possibility that eventually I would fall in love again?" The book ends on a sadder note as she grapples with the death of friends and fights against those who argue that aging is somehow a good thing. Here too she comes away with a great one-line truth: "Anything you think is wrong with your body at the age of thirty-five you will be nostalgic for at the age of forty-five." I wish I'd read this book years ago so I could have tried to run into her on the street in the city, perhaps while getting a cabbage strudel at Andre's on the Upper East Side.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    Ephron is better known as a screen writer, in particular for When Harry Met Sally and Sleepless in Seattle, films with some very funny moments and strong observations about the human psyche and relationships. In this little book, she turns the spotlight back on herself. It is a collection of articles and essays with titles such as I Hate My Handbag and What I Wish I'd Known as well as other things that affect a aging Manhattenite. It is written as a fairly honest account of her life, but whilst Ephron is better known as a screen writer, in particular for When Harry Met Sally and Sleepless in Seattle, films with some very funny moments and strong observations about the human psyche and relationships. In this little book, she turns the spotlight back on herself. It is a collection of articles and essays with titles such as I Hate My Handbag and What I Wish I'd Known as well as other things that affect a aging Manhattenite. It is written as a fairly honest account of her life, but whilst it is honest, it is also a bit dull. She is fairly vain, concerned about keeping her hair an unnatural colour, and getting through vast quantities of beauty products, whilst acknowledging that they don’t work as promised. She is also concerned with her place in the metropolis that is New York, having the right apartment and other frankly frivolous concerns. She does contemplate death too, realising that as she moves through her sixties friends suffer from all manner of illnesses, and she slowly looses them to the grim reaper. It did have a certain charm though and she is obviously a proficient writer, hence the two stars. But my main flaw with it is that for a supposedly funny book, I didn’t laugh once.

  20. 5 out of 5

    CC

    I have to say I'm a little baffled by Nora Ephron. She was in intern in the JFK White House and had a free pass to roam its halls. She was a reporter at Newsweek in the 1960's, before they even had female reporters. She's been married three times. One of her husbands was Pulitzer Prize winner Carl Bernstein of the Watergate scandal. And when he had an affair it wasn't just with any old woman, but with the wife of the British ambassador to the United States. She's been nominated for three academy I have to say I'm a little baffled by Nora Ephron. She was in intern in the JFK White House and had a free pass to roam its halls. She was a reporter at Newsweek in the 1960's, before they even had female reporters. She's been married three times. One of her husbands was Pulitzer Prize winner Carl Bernstein of the Watergate scandal. And when he had an affair it wasn't just with any old woman, but with the wife of the British ambassador to the United States. She's been nominated for three academy awards for screenwriting (Silkwood, When Harry Met Sally, and Sleepless in Seattle). She also directed those films. Her accomplishments are staggering. Impressive for any woman of any era, but harder for her certainly, in those times. The sexism alone she must have faced -- at a hard NY newspaper, in the even harder boys club of Hollywood -- had to have been outrageous. Then why are her essays so flip and shallow? So elitist? Ephron has a dry wit that I find quite pleasing. But the topics? "I Hate my Purse." "I Feel Bad about my Neck." Gah! Vapid and trivial. I mean, this woman should have some shit to say! Too bad she didn't say any of it.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Woodbury

    I read this to have a frivolous, light audiobook during travel. And it does fit the bill. Yet I seem to have lost some of my ability to enjoy frivolous memoir. It was not all that way. I enjoyed very much the section on food, which had hefty helpings of pride and self-deprecation in good measure. I think younger women will not enjoy this book as much and it has nothing to do with much of the subject matter being aging. I want to talk more about aging! I found much of it insightful. The problem I read this to have a frivolous, light audiobook during travel. And it does fit the bill. Yet I seem to have lost some of my ability to enjoy frivolous memoir. It was not all that way. I enjoyed very much the section on food, which had hefty helpings of pride and self-deprecation in good measure. I think younger women will not enjoy this book as much and it has nothing to do with much of the subject matter being aging. I want to talk more about aging! I found much of it insightful. The problem is that Ephron is of a particular feminist generation that enjoys very much saying that choices other women have made are bad choices. Ephron's chapter on parenting, for example, is just ridiculing the modern overinvolved helicopter parent. I myself am not that parent, my style is more like Ephron's, and yet I felt so uncomfortable at it. Younger feminists tend to accept differences in choices and styles more easily. There is also just a lot of privilege here, Ephron has certainly had her ups and downs but generally lives a charmed life, but still talks about herself as though she is just a regular person rather than a very rich person who writes movies. Perhaps others find this charming, I don't particularly. And yet, I still enjoyed listening to her very much.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    http://fromichelle.blogspot.com/2008/... I've finished another book... I Feel Bad About My Neck by Nora Ephron I like Nora. She's real. And she's smart. Nice combination. Add in the fact that she shares her wisdom freely, and also in a funny way, and it makes her even better. I could have written her exact words on reading... "Reading is everything. Reading makes me feel I've accomplished something, learned something, become a better person. Reading makes me smarter. Reading gives me something to http://fromichelle.blogspot.com/2008/... I've finished another book... I Feel Bad About My Neck by Nora Ephron I like Nora. She's real. And she's smart. Nice combination. Add in the fact that she shares her wisdom freely, and also in a funny way, and it makes her even better. I could have written her exact words on reading... "Reading is everything. Reading makes me feel I've accomplished something, learned something, become a better person. Reading makes me smarter. Reading gives me something to talk about later on. Reading is the unbelievably healthy way my attention deficit disorder medicates itself. Reading is escape, and the opposite of escape; it's a way to make contact with reality after a day of making things up, and it's a way of making contact with someone else's imagination after a day that's all too real. Reading is grist. Reading is bliss." Truly, the book is a better read for someone about 10 or 20 years my senior, because what follows the above quote goes... "But my ability to pick something up and read it... is now entirely dependent on the whereabouts of my reading glasses." I Feel Bad About My Neck: and Other Thoughts on Being a Woman is a collection of essays about all things woman... purses, maintenance, parenting, love... Her chapter on Where I Live is something I'll be doing my own version of here sometime soon. Hers goes: 1. I live in New York City... 2. I live in an apartment... 3. I live in my neighborhood... 4. I live at my desk... 5. And of course, I live in my kitchen." And following each of those statements is a string of perfect explanations. And I'll also steal her "What I Wish I'd Known." My favorites of hers are: "You never know." "Whenever someone says, 'Our friendship is more important than this,' watch out, because it almost never is." "There's no point in making pie crust from scratch." "There are no secrets." (Paying attention to that John Edwards?) But my very favorite part of this book also appeared in Oprah Magazine's Aha Moment series. Nora reveals her Aha Moment... "We can't do everything." I adopted this way of life a long time ago. As Nora says, "You would be amazed at how often things sort themselves out without any help from me whatsoever." There is someone I would love to give this book to, but I would be afraid someone might think it an insult... not even sure why! But it is up for grabs to anyone who'd like it! Just say the word!

  23. 5 out of 5

    britt_brooke

    “Reading is everything. Reading makes me feel like I've accomplished something, learned something, become a better person. Reading makes me smarter.” This was a fun essay collection. I listened to the audio, narrated by Ephron, and very much liked her delivery and dry sense of humor. PS. This is where I admit I didn’t realize she was such a prolific screenplay writer. I mean, I obviously know the films, I just didn’t know she wrote them.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Just the right book for a woman of a certain age (or any age). Ephron is funny and good-natured, never feeling sorry for herself as she points out the absurdities in how women try to turn back the clock, performing ‘maintenance’ as if they were half-broken jalopies, only just holding together. (This alongside Diana Athill’s Somewhere Towards the End would provide a good balanced tone.) This collection is also, somewhat surprisingly, very wise on the subject of reading. From “Blind as a Bat”: “ Just the right book for a woman of a certain age (or any age). Ephron is funny and good-natured, never feeling sorry for herself as she points out the absurdities in how women try to turn back the clock, performing ‘maintenance’ as if they were half-broken jalopies, only just holding together. (This alongside Diana Athill’s Somewhere Towards the End would provide a good balanced tone.) This collection is also, somewhat surprisingly, very wise on the subject of reading. From “Blind as a Bat”: “Reading is one of the main things I do. Reading is everything. Reading makes me feel I’ve accomplished something, learned something, become a better person. Reading makes me smarter. Reading gives me something to talk about later on. Reading is the unbelievably healthy way my attention deficit disorder medicates itself. Reading is escape, and the opposite of escape; it’s a way to make contact with reality after a day of making things up, and it’s a way of making contact with someone else’s imagination after a day that’s all too real. Reading is grist. Reading is bliss.” The excellent “On Rapture” essay is also all about reading. Ephron names The Woman in White “the most rapture-inducing book of my adult life,” one that kept her embarrassingly preoccupied on a film set. Luckily, the experience is repeatable: “the state of rapture I experience when I read a wonderful book is one of the main reasons I read, but it doesn’t happen every time or even every other time, and when it does happen, I’m truly beside myself.” (You can read the whole essay on Oprah’s website.)

  25. 5 out of 5

    Cyrus

    I Feel Bad about My Neck: And Other Thoughts on Being a [Rich White] Woman [Living in a Bubble of Privilege on the Upper East Side] I like Nora Ephron (her politics, movies, etc), and I really wanted to enjoy this book. But it's painfully dull, and her "witty insights" are bland/overtrodden enough to make Andy Rooney seem cutting edge. Worse yet, many of her complaints are offensively tone-deaf to the realities most people face. - Nora Ephron sees a homeless woman on the street? Time to complain at I Feel Bad about My Neck: And Other Thoughts on Being a [Rich White] Woman [Living in a Bubble of Privilege on the Upper East Side] I like Nora Ephron (her politics, movies, etc), and I really wanted to enjoy this book. But it's painfully dull, and her "witty insights" are bland/overtrodden enough to make Andy Rooney seem cutting edge. Worse yet, many of her complaints are offensively tone-deaf to the realities most people face. - Nora Ephron sees a homeless woman on the street? Time to complain at length about the price of her weekly hair and nail appointments, and joke that she's just a few missed beauty treatments away from becoming a "bag lady". (Kinda horrifying that a feminist icon would completely ignore — and hell, mock — the humanity of a homeless woman). - Ephron gets surgery done by one of the world's best surgeons? Time to complain about how she wishes she'd had her plastic surgeon present to help avoid a small scar. - NY passes law changing rent-control regulations? Time to complain about how her salary, which exceeds the new $250,000 threshold set by the new law, means the rent will increase on her 7-room Manhattan apartment. The last third of the book is tolerable; she's best when writing about death, the joy of reading, or reminiscing about her days as a young woman in sexist work environments. But it's not enough to overcome the book's overall flaws. In short, these are the ramblings of an old rich person complaining about old rich person problems.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    At first I thought: This is just not something that I can ever in any way understand or comiserate with. Nora Ephron is filthy rich, twice (thrice?) divorced, extreamly successful in her career, living in Manhattan, and 64 years old. She begins with a long discourse on the pain-in-the-neck-ness of having to dye her hair to illiminate gray (I am at least 10% gray and not in the least bit upset or willing to do a thing about it), the ins and outs of purchasing expensive handbags (never, ever At first I thought: This is just not something that I can ever in any way understand or comiserate with. Nora Ephron is filthy rich, twice (thrice?) divorced, extreamly successful in her career, living in Manhattan, and 64 years old. She begins with a long discourse on the pain-in-the-neck-ness of having to dye her hair to illiminate gray (I am at least 10% gray and not in the least bit upset or willing to do a thing about it), the ins and outs of purchasing expensive handbags (never, ever crossed my mind), getting weekly manicures (the last manicure I got was paid for by my mother on the morning of my wedding), and the like. But after these things, Ms. Ephron started talking about her life in NY, her love of experimental cooking, her divorces, her time as an intern at the White House, "parenting", vanishing food, her friend Judy. She got me. She was witty and charming, and her humor was nice and dry, just the way I like it. I give it four big stars, and I think my mother, who reads nothing, should read it, but she probably won't. This will not stop me from pestering her about it through e-mail, however.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Deb Jones

    Do not read/listen to this book if you're searching for answers to life's existential questions. That isn't what this is about, although from the title alone I gathered that. What it is is an insight into some of the pitfalls of becoming older -- frivolous pitfalls with which many readers can identify and laugh about together with the author. As Ehpron so wisely reminds herself and the reader, even though there are difficulties with aging, the alternative is no picnic either.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Erica

    CRAP! I am of an age that I now empathize with these stories instead of just finding them amusing. Damnation. Ok. I don't relate to all the stories. For instance, I don't live in an apt. in NYC, though I do completely understand having a ridiculous amount of love for one's home and community. I don't do the maintenance thing. Well, except now I've started paying more attention to my neck because maybe these last few years or months of preventative measures will make a difference. "Consider the CRAP! I am of an age that I now empathize with these stories instead of just finding them amusing. Damnation. Ok. I don't relate to all the stories. For instance, I don't live in an apt. in NYC, though I do completely understand having a ridiculous amount of love for one's home and community. I don't do the maintenance thing. Well, except now I've started paying more attention to my neck because maybe these last few years or months of preventative measures will make a difference. "Consider the Alternative" was hard to listen to. And sad. I mean, it's supposed to be sad, it's about death. But hearing that best friends die, that's hard. And then listening to her talk about death and her saying, "By the time you read this, I'll be" and I thought, "Dead." Because that is how it actually worked out and that is also sad. Regardless, many of these essays made me smile either with a knowing look or with joy or with a sense of smugness. I liked this book. P.S. I do not recommend following this with Sister Mother Husband Dog: Etc.. Delia starts it out with the Nora's end days. I've been crying in the car for two drives, now. It's been hard to go from Nora talking about death, losing her BFF and wondering who was next - and now I know she knew she was sick when she wrote that - to Delia talking about how her sister's death impacted her, both during and after and still, I am sure. OMG, it just hurts. And it's scary. I have a sister. We don't collaborate on books, we're not famous, but I can't lose her and this part of the book is terrifying to me because I don't want to think about the surviving sister syndrome. And it's sad. So I don't recommend it as a chaser.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Rice

    I have a love-hate relationship with Nora Ephron. On the one hand, she's a Democrat, so I feel a certain allegience with her. I want to like her. Sometimes I actually get what she's saying. Other times I think, can you hear yourself? Is that really what you think? Are you that vapid? She makes a point, a brilliant point, then suddenly punctures it with a denigrating remark - perhaps to keep us from taking her too seriously, perhaps to make us laugh - but it detsroys the momentum and lets us down. I have a love-hate relationship with Nora Ephron. On the one hand, she's a Democrat, so I feel a certain allegience with her. I want to like her. Sometimes I actually get what she's saying. Other times I think, can you hear yourself? Is that really what you think? Are you that vapid? She makes a point, a brilliant point, then suddenly punctures it with a denigrating remark - perhaps to keep us from taking her too seriously, perhaps to make us laugh - but it detsroys the momentum and lets us down. So she goes on here about aging when you are rich and famous. I suppose it's meant to be aging for all women, but she clearly has no understanding of how the majority of women live. She had a privileged upbringing and career that has pretty much kept her safely separated from how people making less than $30,000 a year live. Here she describes the pursuit of a grossly expensive handbag, something called eyebrow weaving, an apartment building she used to live in where the rent per month was more than I make in a year, and - of course - necks revealing age as surely as the rings in the stump of a tree. Perhaps it's me. Perhaps I just am not equipped with a sense of humor subtle enough to appreciate her turns of phrase. I mean, I loved When Harry Met Sally, though it was filled with recycled Ephronisms - "pesto is the quiche of the '80s," "thin, pretty, big tits, your basic nightmare." I should love her books. Instead, I love/hate them.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bookmarks Magazine

    Nora Ephron, best known for her screenplays When Harry Met Sally, Sleepless in Seattle, and Silkwood and best sellers Heartburn and Crazy Salad, has written a sort of Ephron retrospective. Though humorously self-deprecating and poignant, critics agree that the essays, some published previously,are uneven. Readers may love "I Hate My Purse"__unless they find it outdated. Other essays came off as vain, stale, or elitist in their carefree attitude toward luxury items. Only "Considering the Nora Ephron, best known for her screenplays When Harry Met Sally, Sleepless in Seattle, and Silkwood and best sellers Heartburn and Crazy Salad, has written a sort of Ephron retrospective. Though humorously self-deprecating and poignant, critics agree that the essays, some published previously,are uneven. Readers may love "I Hate My Purse"__unless they find it outdated. Other essays came off as vain, stale, or elitist in their carefree attitude toward luxury items. Only "Considering the Alternative" received uniform praise for its generous introspection. Despite the collection's lightweight feel, Ephron still writes "like someone who has something useful and important to tell her readers" (Los Angeles Times). "When your children are teenagers," for example, "it's important to have a dog so that someone in the house is happy to see you."This is an excerpt from a review published in Bookmarks magazine.

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